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The view from the top of business, presenting a clearer view of the business world, through discussion with people running companies.

The view from the top of business, presenting a clearer view of the business world, through discussion with people running companies.
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Location:

United Kingdom

Networks:

BBC

Description:

The view from the top of business, presenting a clearer view of the business world, through discussion with people running companies.

Language:

English


Episodes

Ukraine's troubles with Mariupol

3/20/2019
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Ed Butler reports from Mariupol port in eastern Ukraine. The port has lost a third of its fleet and up to 140,000 tonnes of exported metal products a month since Russia's construction of a bridge across the Kerch Strait in May 2018, and restrictions on the size of ships that can pass underneath. Cargo vessels are being delayed by up to a week, and the cranes on the dock stand idle. Larger international shipping firms have simply stopped coming. Hundreds of jobs depend on the work here -...

Duration:00:17:44

Is humankind on the verge of disaster?

3/19/2019
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To follow the world's headlines these days - from fake news to murderous terror attacks, from disease pandemics to global warming - you might be forgiven for thinking the world is becoming a pretty scary place. But is it really? Harvard University cognitive psychologist and author Steven Pinker tells us that is measurably not the case. As he argues in his new book Enlightenment Now, we are in a golden age of human existence. But, David Edmonds meets academics who are putting Pinker's ideas...

Duration:00:18:21

The periodic table turns 150

3/18/2019
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Are chemical elements critical for the modern economy in dangerously short supply? It's a question that Justin Rowlatt poses a century and a half after the Russian chemist Dmitry Mendeleev published the original periodic table. Justin speaks to two chemists - Andrea Sella of University College London explains the significance of Mendeleev's scheme to the modern world, while David Cole-Hamilton talks us through an updated version of the table he has just published that highlights chemical...

Duration:00:20:10

Neverending Brexit?

3/15/2019
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As the UK parliament votes to delay Brexit beyond 29 March, businesses brace for yet more uncertainty. But will the EU even be willing to grant a delay? Manuela Saragosa speaks to companies on both sides of the English Channel. British Barley farmer Matt Culley says he now has to plant his coming year's crop with no clue whether or how he will even be able to export his produce to breweries in Germany come harvest time. Meanwhile Chayenne Wiskerke, who runs the world's biggest onion...

Duration:00:18:29

Heineken in Africa

3/14/2019
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The brewer has been accused of complicity with Africa's murkiest politics, and of failing to protect female brand promoters from sexual harassment. But can a company really separate itself from its political environment? Manuela Saragosa hears from the Dutch investigative journalist Olivier van Beemen, whose book Heineken in Africa makes multiple accusations against the company, including collusion with the regimes of Burundi and DR Congo. Plus Heineken provides its response. But is it a...

Duration:00:18:42

More Brexit blues for business

3/13/2019
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A continued political crisis in the UK means more uncertainty for businesses. We hear from the boss of a manufacturing company in Birmingham and Nicole Sykes, head of EU negotiations at the UK business group the CBI, as well as the BBC's Rob Watson in Westminster and Adam Fleming in Strasbourg. (Photo: A protester carries an EU flag in London, Credit: Getty Images)

Duration:00:19:17

Ukraine's corruption problem

3/12/2019
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Ed Butler reports from Ukraine ahead of the presidential elections scheduled for the end of March. With endemic corruption and ongoing conflict with Russian-backed rebels in the east, what verdict will the voters give to the President Petro Poroshenko? Ed Butler speaks with MP Serhiy Leschenko who's recently left Poroshenko's Solidarity faction over concerns about corruption and nepotism. Other candidates include the former Prime Minister Yulia Timoshenko and comedian and actor Volodymyr...

Duration:00:18:29

Education in India: In need of reform?

3/11/2019
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In India experts and parents increasingly question whether the country's education system is fit for purpose. With huge emphasis placed on college entrance exams and academic degrees - like engineering, medicine or law - Rahul Tandon explores what consequences that has on children's overall development. He visits an unorthodox school that uses Harry Potter to develop critical thinking, and he asks whether the economy would be better served by encouraging vocational training. (Picture:...

Duration:00:17:43

Women in a man's world

3/8/2019
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In a world designed by men for men, women often come off worst, sometimes with fatal consequences. Manuela Saragosa speaks to author Caroline Criado Perez about the gender data gap - the fact that everything from smartphone health apps to lapel microphones is designed with a male body in mind, and how for example cardiovascular problems in women go under-diagnosed because the female body is treated as "atypical". This blind spot for women is built into our work environments in large part...

Duration:00:18:47

Big Sugar

3/7/2019
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Is the US sugar industry's relationship with politicians, from Florida to Washington DC, just a little bit too sweet? Gilda Di Carli reports from the Sunshine State, where the newly elected Governor Ron DeSantis has vowed to take on the sugarcane lobby, which he blames for impeding efforts to tackle the gigantic algae blooms that have blighted Florida's rivers and coasts. Meanwhile Manuela Saragosa speaks to Guy Rolnik, professor of strategic management at the Chicago Booth School, about two...

Duration:00:18:35

A very sweet episode

3/6/2019
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Elizabeth Hotson tracks the rise of sugar as a luxury good and its transformation into a staple of western diets. Sara Pennell, a Senior Lecturer in History at the University of Greenwich will explain some of sugar's history as well as the dark strands of human history that made it affordable for so many. We’ll also hear about sugar addiction, the efforts to reduce the sugar content of western diets and the companies resisting the change. Picture: An assortment of chocolates; Credit:...

Duration:00:18:17

Is a falling currency a good thing?

3/5/2019
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Does a falling currency help or harm the economy? It's an urgent question for the UK, as the pound fell sharply in value against other major currencies after the referendum on Britain’s membership of the European Union in June 2016. Market commentators put this down to foreign investors becoming intensely gloomy about the prospects for the UK economy after Brexit. Others have welcomed the drop, saying it will benefit British exporters. But is it really such a simple, binary question? Paul...

Duration:00:17:29

Twenty-first century monopolies

3/4/2019
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Nearly everyone agrees monopolies are bad. That’s why there has been legislation limiting the dominance of companies, known as anti-trust legislation, for well over a century in the United States. But in the past anti-trust had as their target the traditional big companies like Standard Oil, with their dominance of physical resources and marketing networks and, most importantly, prices. Jonathan Tepper, author of the new book The Myth of Capitalism: Monopolies and the Death of Competition,...

Duration:00:17:26

Overworked doctors

3/1/2019
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Are health services around the world wilfully blind to the problem of dangerously long hours being worked by junior medics? Vivienne Nunis speaks to doctors in Australia and America about how tiredness and depression are not only ruining their lives, but also pose a threat to the safety of patients going under the knife or receiving prescriptions. And it's a worldwide problem - as Sydney-based doctor Yumiko Kadota discovered when a blog she wrote attracted similar stories of exhaustion from...

Duration:00:18:42

Fix my gadgets!

3/1/2019
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Our appliances are getting increasingly difficult and expensive to mend, in some cases by design. So should consumers demand the right to repair? Ed Butler speaks to those campaigning for manufacturers to make it easier for us to fix our electronics goods - with everything from tractors to phones to baby incubators in their sites. Clare Seek runs a Repair Café in Portsmouth, England, a specially designated venue for anyone who wants to get their stuff to last longer. And Ed travels to...

Duration:00:18:05

Who's monetising your DNA?

2/27/2019
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Should the collection of vast genetic databases be dominated by private companies such as 23andMe or Ancestry.com? In the second of two programmes looking at the businesses riding high on the boom in home DNA testing kits, Manuela Saragosa looks at how the enormous head start these companies have over public sector DNA research initiatives may be skewing medical research. Will the profit motive drive these companies to wall off their databases, and give access only to pharmaceutical...

Duration:00:18:43

The family tree business

2/26/2019
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What can you really learn about your heritage from a home DNA testing kit? We hear from Bill and Ylva Wires, a couple in Berlin who used DNA testing kits to find out more about their ancestors. Manuela Saragosa speaks to Rafi Mendelsohn of MyHeritage.com - one major company in this field - and Kristen V Brown who covers genetics stories for Bloomberg. (Photo: Old family photos, Credit: Getty Images)

Duration:00:18:05

Bad blood in Silicon Valley

2/25/2019
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The story of Theranos, a company that falsely claimed it could perform a full range of medical tests using just a tiny blood sample drawn by pricking your finger. Manuela Saragosa speaks to John Carreyrou, an investigative reporter with the Wall Street Journal and author of a book on the case, Bad Blood. Plus Silicon Valley venture capitalist Hemant Taneja explains why investors need to be more cautious. (Photo: Blood samples, Credit: Getty Images)

Duration:00:18:39

Is it time to regulate social media?

2/22/2019
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Should Facebook and others be forced by governments to take responsibility for what people are exposed to on their platforms? Social media companies' algorithms have come under particular scrutiny, with allegations that they push inappropriate content - such as neo-Nazi propaganda, self-harm videos and conspiracy theories - to its users, including to children. "Angry Aussie" YouTuber Andrew Kay describes how the video sharing platform shifted from being a site for video bloggers, to a place...

Duration:00:18:47

Is healthy eating affordable?

2/21/2019
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Poor diet has been linked to diseases such as diabetes and cancer, but do you have much of a choice if you are on a tight budget? Organic food is rising in popularity in the West, but Vishala Sri-Pathma asks nutritionist Sophie Medlin whether the additional cost of buying organic is actually worth it. And what if you are time poor, as well as short of money? Chef Tom Kerridge has tips for how even if you have just 20 minutes spare, it's still possible to pull together a healthy family meal....

Duration:00:18:04