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The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range”. For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio.

The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range”. For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio.
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London, United Kingdom

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The Economist

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The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range”. For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio.

Language:

English


Episodes

The world ahead: Slow social

3/22/2019
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In this episode we discuss why, after years of trying to make their products as addictive as possible, social-media companies are now heading in the opposite direction. We look forward to key dates later this year for elections, Chinese anniversaries and historic figures. And we ask what the former headmaster of Eton College is bringing to China’s educational system. Tom Standage hosts. Music by Chris Zabriskie "Candlepower" (CC x 4.0)

Duration:00:24:45

The never-ending saga: Brexit delayed

3/22/2019
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European leaders nixed Theresa May’s request to postpone Brexit for three months, but have given her a short-term reprieve - delaying it by a few weeks and possibly longer. Thailand is about to hold its first election since the military seized power five years ago. The only hitch is that the generals are trying to influence the outcome, and anyone who criticises the ruling royal family can be thrown in prison. And how do you make a whisky age more quickly? The answer lies in dance music. We...

Duration:00:22:51

The Economist asks: Ben Shapiro

3/21/2019
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Anne McElvoy asks the controversial podcast host, and author of “The Right Side of History”, why he thinks the West needs a revival of old-fashioned values. In the wake of the mass shootings in New Zealand, they debate whether individuals, platforms or governments are responsible for controlling extreme content online. Also, does Ben Shapiro ever regret having gone too far and which presidential hopeful gets his bet for 2020 and beyond? Music by Chris Zabriskie, “Divider” (CC by 4.0 UK)

Duration:00:31:16

Not now, Theresa: Postponing Britain’s EU goodbye

3/21/2019
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With just eight days to go before Brexit, Britain’s Prime Minister Theresa May wants to extend the leaving date. As an EU summit gathers, Donald Tusk, president of the European Council, insists she needs to get her twice-rejected deal through Parliament first. Also, are stronger strains of cannabis causing psychosis among users? And why Kim Jong Un and Donald Trump should have eaten “family-style” to help pull off a nuclear deal.

Duration:00:19:25

Babbage: Insectageddon?

3/20/2019
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The insect apocalypse may not be imminent, but the decline of insect species is still a concern. And we speak to Dr Angela Gallop about her career as one of Britain’s most eminent forensic scientists. Also, when will a robot barista serve you a latte? Kenneth Cukier hosts

Duration:00:19:46

Alpha Beto: O’Rourke’s appeal

3/20/2019
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Beto O’Rourke launched his bid for America’s presidency. Despite his relative lack of experience, he’s already been raking in donations. We look at the source of his appeal. And palm oil is ubiquitous in many consumer goods used today, but it comes at a high environmental cost. Also, does the field of economics have a culture that is off-putting to women?

Duration:00:21:35

Money talks: #Metoo in Economics

3/19/2019
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A new survey published this week shows harassment and discrimination are widespread problems in the academic field of economics. Soumaya Keynes, our US Economics Editor, speaks to those in the field and Ben Bernanke, President of the American Economic Association, about their experiences and what can be done to achieve change

Duration:00:18:01

War and pestilence: Ebola makes a comeback

3/19/2019
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Five years ago Ebola spread across West Africa, killing more than 10,000 people. In August a fresh outbreak hit the war-torn Democratic Republic of Congo. We look at why the response this time around has been so ineffective. NATO is about to turn 70. It will not be a happy birthday. And Rodrigo Duterte wants to rename the Philippines.

Duration:00:23:00

Tasting menu: Audio highlights from the March 16th 2019 edition

3/18/2019
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After Theresa May’s deal was decisively rejected for a second time, Brexit will almost certainly be delayed. It is time for Parliament to seize the initiative. Plus, how sharing a plate of food could help international diplomacy. And, the world wide web has turned 30—what does its future hold? Lane Greene hosts

Duration:00:13:25

Replacement anxiety: White supremacist terrorism

3/18/2019
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The terrorist attack in Christchurch, New Zealand, has left 50 people dead and a lot of unanswered questions. How big a threat are violent white supremacists? We take a look at a network of museums in China trying to commemorate that country’s murderous experience in the 20th century without offending the Communist Party. And our San Francisco correspondent goes in pursuit of free stuff - a lot of it-in the Bay Area.

Duration:00:23:43

Can't deal with it: Brexit

3/15/2019
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It’s been another brutal week for Britain’s prime minister as her deal to leave Europe was swatted down comprehensively—again. As a delay to Brexit looks likely, we ask what all the chaos reveals about how Brexit will ultimately play out. Ahead of global climate protests by schoolchildren, we examine how a proposal regarding geoengineering—radically reversing the effects of climate change—reflects coming squabbles over regulating the approaches. And, why is it so difficult to open an Irish...

Duration:00:22:33

The Economist asks: Ricky Gervais

3/14/2019
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Anne McElvoy asks the award-winning stand-up comedian and creator of "The Office" whether there are any taboos left in comedy and if it matters when people are offended. They discuss seeing the funny side of illness, addiction, death and grief in his new comedy, “After Life”, and whether dogs might save the world

Duration:00:20:47

Lights out: Venezuela’s blackout

3/14/2019
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Power cuts in Caracas have endangered lives and deepened the misery of Venezuelans. It’s another sign of the corruption that pervades the Maduro regime. Also, how do you make a 10,000 ton ship disappear? And the Hebrew bible - otherwise known as the old testament - gets a fresh new translation. Music courtesy of Ethan James McCollum

Duration:00:22:45

Babbage: Pioneers of the WWW

3/13/2019
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Kenneth Cukier gets in the Babbage time machine and travels to 1989, when Sir Tim Berners-Lee wrote the famous memo that laid the foundations for the world wide web. Kenn speaks to some of the other key figures that influenced its invention, like Ted Nelson and Vint Cerf, and then asks what the WWW might look like in the future.

Duration:00:21:45

Losing the plot: Brexit

3/13/2019
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The second defeat of British Prime Minister’s plan for withdrawal from the EU has weakened her. But what does it mean for the risk of a no-deal outcome? The chances of a Brexit delay are rising by the day. Competition between major powers for influence in Africa is intensifying, as Russia, China, Europe and America all see potential in the continent. And more gender-inclusive language is proving a headache for grammarians.

Duration:00:21:25

Money talks: Boeing grounded

3/12/2019
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Several countries have grounded Boeing’s 737 Max after two catastrophic crashes. What are the precedents and can the business recover? Also, as China’s giant current-account surplus vanishes, could this lead to the Chinese economy opening up? And Volkswagen announces plans to cut jobs as it launches a fleet of new electric cars. Simon Long hosts

Duration:00:23:44

Flying stop: Boeing

3/12/2019
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Following a second fatal crash of Boeing’s 737-MAX, China was quick to ground its fleet of the newish airliner. What does this mean for the world’s largest planemaker? In Russia, protests have broken out against President Vladimir Putin’s attempt to isolate and control the country’s internet. His bid to regain Russians’ full attention may come too late. And, we look at why so many women are getting divorced in Bangladesh. Additional audio from Anton Scherbakov

Duration:00:21:43

Tasting menu: Audio highlights from the March 9th 2019 edition

3/11/2019
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A new “scramble for Africa” is taking place. This time Africans themselves stand to benefit the most. Also, a dispatch from the frozen Antarctic, and what the samba-dancers of Rio de Janeiro reveal about Brazil’s neglected history – and its present. Christopher Lockwood hosts

Duration:00:17:08

The sensitive month: Tibet

3/11/2019
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China’s party leaders get nervous in March—a month full of anniversaries that Tibetans hold dear. As the 60th anniversary of Tibet’s uprising approaches, security is tighter than usual. Corporate-risk managers are rotten at assessing their exposure to a changing climate; we examine the dangers that many are ignoring. And, a look back at André Previn—and a life of far more than just show tunes and showmanship. Additional audio courtesy of Twitter users @ngagya95 and @TibetPeople

Duration:00:25:02

The Economist asks: Is education the great leap forward for feminism?

3/8/2019
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Meghan Markle (the Duchess of Sussex), Annie Lennox, Adwoa Aboah, Julia Gillard and other guests discuss feminism with Anne McElvoy on International Women’s Day. They debate how to end period poverty, what men and boys can do and does the Duchess get irked by charges of supporting "trendy" causes? The event was organised by the Queen’s Commonwealth Trust

Duration:00:47:21