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The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range”. For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio.

The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range”. For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio.
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London, United Kingdom

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The Economist

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The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range”. For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio.

Language:

English


Episodes

The Economist asks: Who will decide the fate of Hong Kong?

8/16/2019
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Former Chief Secretary of the territory, Anson Chan, has called on leader Carrie Lam to withdraw a controversial law which sparked a wave of protests. Anne McElvoy asks her whether Hong Kong’s special status is under threat and, 30 years after the Tiananmen Square massacre in Beijing, if history might repeat itself? Anne also speaks with our Asia columnist, Dominic Ziegler, who has been reporting on the story since it began For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Duration:00:25:51

Yield signs: the global economy

8/16/2019
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Investors are piling into safe assets as markets whipsaw: what’s driving the global economy these days is anxiety. Is all the worry justified? Nestled among the conflicts and suffering in the Democratic Republic of Congo is a vast national park that is trying to make the most of its stunning natural beauty. And, why are some languages so damnably hard to learn? Additional audio by ‘sctang’ from Freesound.org. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Duration:00:22:56

Editor’s picks: August 15th 2019

8/15/2019
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A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, markets are braced for a global downturn. (10:00) Bernie Sanders could hand the Democratic ticket to a moderate. (18:02) And, investors are growing disenchanted with Narendra Modi For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Duration:00:31:02

Poll reposition: Macri fights back

8/15/2019
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President Mauricio Macri’s thumping presidential-primary loss in Argentina left the markets fearing a left-wing resurgence. To win over voters, he’s announced a relaxation of some austerity measures. Will it be enough? In the Arctic, wildfires are rampant—and they’ll amplify the very temperature rises that caused them. And, a look at the unlikely rise of Gulf-state book fairs. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Duration:00:20:24

Babbage: A cure for Ebola?

8/14/2019
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Two treatments for Ebola have emerged from a clinical trial in Africa. Scientists estimate that sea-levels across the globe will rise by 50cm or so in the next 80 years; in some places they could go up by twice as much. Are governments and businesses prepared to deal with the rising tides? And, as face-recognition technology spreads, so do ideas for subverting it. Kenneth Cukier hosts For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Duration:00:20:59

Let’s not make a deal: Brexit

8/14/2019
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Talk grows ever-louder of Britain exiting the European Union without a divorce agreement. Most parliamentarians would rather avoid that—but can they do anything to stop it? We join a Ukrainian military exercise as the country seeks to beef up defences that were nearly wiped out by Russia’s annexation of Crimea. And, China’s tech companies train their sights on the tech-savvy elderly. Additional audio: "English Dawn Chorus, Rural, late spring" by odilonmarcenaro at Freesound.org and “Puzzle...

Duration:00:21:50

The Secret History of the Future: Bug in the System

8/14/2019
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The first ever computer program was written in 1843 by Ada Lovelace, a mathematician who hoped her far-sighted treatise on mechanical computers would lead to a glittering scientific career. Today, as we worry that modern systems suffer from “algorithmic bias” against some groups of people, what can her program tell us about how software, and the people who make it, can go wrong? For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Duration:00:35:24

Money talks: Delayed tariffication

8/13/2019
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President Trump has delayed some tariffs on Chinese imports. Soumaya Keynes, our US economics editor, explains the surprise decision and its implications for the global economy. Also, is data as valuable an asset as oil? What can companies learn from the oil industry about keeping data safe? And, the secrets of success for online fashion retailers. Rachana Shanbogue hosts For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Duration:00:21:55

Sex cells: the modern fertility business

8/13/2019
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Companies are rushing to fill new niches for would-be parents: in vitro fertilisation extras, swish egg-harvesting “studios” and apps to track reproductive health. But some companies promise more than science can deliver. The worrying flare-up of piracy off west Africa presents new challenges and unmitigated risks to sailors. And, lessons learned from a shooting simulator for police. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Duration:00:21:39

Raid in Aden: Yemen’s fragmented conflict

8/12/2019
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Over the weekend, armed rebels overran Aden, the seat of Yemen’s internationally recognised government. They had defected from a loose, Saudi-backed coalition that looks increasingly shaky. The gaming business is huge, but isn’t yet part of the streaming revolution seen in films and music; who will become the Netflix of gaming? And, an update to a 1970s book on sexuality reveals much about modern female desire, and how it’s perceived. Additional music by Rymdkraft and Kuesa. For...

Duration:00:22:26

The Economist asks: Is LA the model for a more diverse America?

8/9/2019
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Eric Garcetti, the mayor of Los Angeles, argues America’s second largest city benefits from being a melting pot. Anne McElvoy asks him how he is faring in tackling the city’s housing crisis and why he is not running for the Democratic nomination in 2020. They address allegations of racism in the White House and, in the wake of two mass shootings, how to curb gun violence in America. Also, could smooth jazz prevent traffic jams? For information regarding your data privacy, visit...

Duration:00:32:09

Withdrawal symptoms: America-Taliban talks

8/9/2019
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America’s envoy claimed “excellent progress” in negotiations ahead of the country’s planned exit from Afghanistan. But stickier talks await, between the Islamist militia and the Afghan government. A promising new vaccine may at last tackle typhoid fever, which claims 160,000 lives every year. And, we travel to Scotland and hop on the world’s shortest scheduled flight. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Duration:00:19:54

Editor’s picks: August 8th 2019

8/8/2019
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A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, China’s response to the protests in Hong Kong could have global repercussions. The British government claims it is too late for MPs to prevent the country leaving the EU on October 31st. Yet many are determined to try (9:12). And, Norway has had its fillet of fish-smugglers (16:33) For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Duration:00:19:47

Clear-cut risks: the Amazon degrades

8/8/2019
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Deforestation is on the rise and Brazil’s government is all but encouraging it. Beyond a certain threshold, the world’s largest rainforest will dry out into a savanna—with dire consequences. We ask why Malaysia’s reformist coalition isn’t doing much reforming of the country’s illiberal laws. And, Norway’s growing scourge of fish-smuggling. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Duration:00:21:43

Babbage: Meno-Pause

8/7/2019
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Can pioneering surgery help delay the menopause and how will it impact women's lives? And, Clara Vu, of Veo Robotics, explains some of the challenges of designing “cobots”, robots that work collaboratively with humans on manufacturing tasks. Also, should people have the right to choose to know if they are a carrier of a hereditary genetic disease? Alok Jha hosts For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Duration:00:21:13

State of alarm: India moves on Kashmir

8/7/2019
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Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s government has gutted the autonomy of the restive and disputed Jammu & Kashmir. India’s only majority-Muslim state is locked down and fearful of a vast demographic reshuffle. We meet the deep-sea divers of the oil industry, finding that their work is as dangerous as it is dependent on oil prices. And, what is a “deepfake”, how are they made and what risks do they pose? For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Duration:00:22:04

The Secret History of the Future: Dots, Dashes and Dating Apps

8/7/2019
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In the 19th century, young people wooed each other over the telegraph. But meeting strangers on the wires could lead to confusion, disappointment, and even fraud. Do modern online dating apps have anything to learn from telegraph romances? For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Duration:00:37:40

Money talks: Yuan-a fight?

8/6/2019
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President Donald Trump has accused China of being a currency manipulator, after the Chinese currency “po qi” or “cracked 7” against the US dollar— a psychologically significant value—for the first time in over a decade. How will this escalation of the US-China trade war affect global markets? Also, how useful are yield curves for predicting future recessions? And, life without Uber. Rachana Shanbhogue presents. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Duration:00:21:50

PLA a part? Hong Kong’s growing unrest

8/6/2019
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China’s central government held another press conference to address increasingly chaotic unrest in Hong Kong. A close listen reveals language that may be presaging a military intervention. There’s much to be said for employee share ownership—but a push from left-leaning politicians to mandate its availability is creating controversy. And, the dirty secret behind the exorbitant costs of music-gig tickets. Additional audio courtesy of cgeffex from Freesound.org. For information regarding...

Duration:00:20:26

Sticking to their guns: violence in America

8/5/2019
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Two mass shootings over the weekend add to the unrelenting stream of gun violence in America. We look at the political and social forces that ensure it will continue. The collapse of Venezuela’s infrastructure has left its people desperate for medical care. We meet some of the women crossing into Colombia to seek help. And, the politics behind the ever-shifting travel advice dispensed in the Middle East. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Duration:00:23:41