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The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

Location:

London, United Kingdom

Networks:

The Economist

Description:

The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

Language:

English


Episodes

Money Talks: In recovery?

7/7/2020
As some lockdown measures lift, governments hope they can get their economies back on track. Which will have the strongest recovery? Also, meal-delivery wars heat up as Uber gobbles up rival Postmates in an all-stock deal worth over $2.6bn. And, the importance of building a more resilient food-supply chain. Rachana Shanbhogue hosts. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer ____________________ See...

Duration:00:22:15

Off like a shot: the race for a covid-19 vaccine

7/7/2020
A British team is leading the race for the one innovation that could, in time, halt the coronavirus crisis. But once a vaccine is approved, who would get it, where, and how fast? An Ethiopian musician’s murder has inflamed the ethnic tensions that threaten the country’s transition to democracy. And a rollicking tale of sloppy spycraft in Fiji. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy...

Duration:00:21:51

Attention deficit: China’s campaign against Uighurs

7/6/2020
Unparalleled surveillance, forced labour, even allegations of ethnic cleansing: atrocities in Xinjiang province carry on. Why are governments and businesses so loth to protest? The field of economics is, at last, facing up to its long-standing race problem. And how covid-19 is scrambling Scandinavians’ stereotypes about one another. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy...

Duration:00:24:57

Editor’s Picks: July 6th 2020

7/6/2020
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Joe Biden: Retro or radical? (9:34), the world is not experiencing a second wave of covid-19—it never got over the first (15:25), and a phoney referendum shows that Putin’s legitimacy is fading. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Duration:00:28:35

Checks and Balance: Monuments men

7/3/2020
President Trump is celebrating July 4th with four revered forerunners at Mount Rushmore. Anti-racist protests have brought down dozens of smaller monuments in the past month. The president says the left wants to “vandalise our history.” But Americans have never felt less proud of their national identity, according to Gallup. What is the political impact of this national soul-searching? John Prideaux, The Economist’s US editor, hosts with Charlotte Howard, New York bureau chief, and...

Duration:00:41:45

Into left field? America's chief justice

7/3/2020
Recent Supreme Court rulings might seem like a leftward shift. But Chief Justice John Roberts is leaving loopholes for future conservative challenges. China’s video-sharing social network TikTok was wildly popular in India, until the government pulled the plug this week. And why high-end Bordeaux wines are so (relatively) cheap. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and...

Duration:00:23:32

The Economist Asks: David Malpass

7/2/2020
The Economist Asks: David Malpass The president of the World Bank talks to host Anne McElvoy and Henry Curr, our economics editor, about how to stop covid-19 undoing decades of progress on global poverty. A veteran of the Trump and Reagan administrations, David Malpass argues that the private sector needs to step up. And what role should China play, as the biggest lender to most of the world’s poorest countries—is it guilty of “debt-trap diplomacy”? Please subscribe to The Economist for...

Duration:00:28:18

Unsettled question: Israel’s annexation threat

7/2/2020
A once-fringe position on annexing the West Bank is now a real prospect. But both international support and opposition are lukewarm; not even Israelis think it a priority. For years, war-crimes allegations hung over Kosovo’s president. Now a court has weighed in—undercutting long-running territorial talks with Serbia. And why flashy homes in Sierra Leone’s capital are taxed the same as tin-roofed shacks. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here...

Duration:00:22:39

Babbage: Predicting pandemics

7/1/2020
As covid-19 continues to devastate the world and scientists race to develop therapeutics and vaccines, Alok Jha investigates how to get ahead of the curve and prevent the next pandemic. Scientists explain how studying the relationship between animals and humans, and finding and genetically sequencing the millions of as-yet-undiscovered animal viruses in the wild, could stop future disease outbreaks becoming global health catastrophes. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to...

Duration:00:24:13

Two systems go: a new law grips Hong Kong

7/1/2020
A sweeping new national-security law deeply undermines Beijing’s “one country, two systems” approach in the territory; under it, arrests have already been made. What next for Hong Kong’s activists and its businesses? Malawi’s overturned election is a ray of hope that democracy can survive both incumbents’ strongman tactics and covid-19. And the varied successes of pro- and anti-Trump tell-all books. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here...

Duration:00:22:52

Money Talks: Unfriending Facebook

6/30/2020
Companies including Unilever, Coca-Cola and Verizon are pulling their ads from Facebook because of its content-moderation policies. Does this spell trouble for the social-media giant? Also, why investors’ love of commercial property is being tested. And, e-sports v traditional sports. Rachana Shanbhogue hosts. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Duration:00:23:38

The next threat: confronting global risks

6/30/2020
Six months on from the first reports of the coronavirus, this special episode examines the catastrophic and even existential risks to civilisation. Work is already under way to head off future pandemics, but how to prepare—and who can take on preparing—for the gravest threats with the longest odds? For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Duration:00:25:04

The World Ahead: Bus to the future

6/29/2020
What is the future of public transport in the wake of the covid-19 pandemic? Also, the United Nations’ Assistant Secretary-General on how countries should prepare for future disasters. And could a “carbon surveillance” system help save the planet? Tom Standage hosts Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Duration:00:28:25

States of alarm: America’s covid-19 surge

6/29/2020
An entirely predictable pattern is playing out: the states quickest to exit lockdowns are being hit hardest. Can the country get the virus reliably under control? The pandemic has led to staggering amounts of excess plastic waste, now washing up on shores near you. And the growing risks to South Korea’s tradition of bullfighting. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and...

Duration:00:23:08

Editor’s Picks: June 29th 2020

6/29/2020
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the next catastrophe and how to survive it; (9:40) the risks of annexation for Israel; (21:50) and the Wirecard scandal. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Duration:00:27:54

Checks and Balance: Bias beware

6/26/2020
Impartiality in political journalism is under scrutiny as never before. President Trump took a trademark pop at the “fakers” when he resumed his campaign rallies in Tulsa. Meanwhile the White House has begun decapitating state-funded global news agencies like Voice of America. Can fair-minded reporting survive hyper-partisan politics? John Prideaux, The Economist’s US editor, hosts with Charlotte Howard, New York bureau chief, and Washington correspondent Jon Fasman. For access to The...

Duration:00:39:55

Council insecurity: the UN at 75

6/26/2020
The founders of the United Nations expected it would move with the times. It hasn’t. Can reforms keep all those nations united? The global focus on policing following George Floyd’s death has sparked a reckoning for television shows that distort Americans’ views of cops. And with this weekend’s Glastonbury festival long since postponed, we ask how live music will survive the pandemic. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here...

Duration:00:24:56

The Economist Asks: António Guterres

6/25/2020
Seventy-five years after the foundation of the United Nations, host Anne McElvoy and Daniel Franklin, The Economist’s diplomatic editor, ask Secretary-General Guterres whether the organisation still works. The dysfunctional relationship between its three dominant powers, America, China and Russia, has dangerous consequences—does the UN need to reinvent itself to work with them? And could the WHO’s relationship with China have undermined its efforts to stop the spread of the...

Duration:00:29:29

Rush to a conclusion: Latin America’s lockdowns

6/25/2020
After scattershot enforcement of lockdowns, the region has become the pandemic’s new focal point. But many countries are opening up anyway. America’s latest choke on immigration is aligned with the president’s politics—but not with the tech industry’s needs. And southern France faces a tourist season sans tourists. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out...

Duration:00:22:19

Babbage: Track and trace

6/24/2020
Contact tracing is one of the tools being used against covid-19, but in the age of the smartphone, technology presents a new way to improve the process. Kenneth Cukier explores why contact-tracing apps have not yet delivered on their promise, how they can preserve privacy and what today’s decisions mean for the future of technology in society. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy for...

Duration:00:33:12