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The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range”. For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio.

The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range”. For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio.

Location:

London, United Kingdom

Networks:

The Economist

Description:

The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range”. For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio.

Language:

English


Episodes

Babbage: Going viral, going global

2/26/2020
Covid-19, the new coronavirus, is spreading around the world. Abdi Mahamad, the World Health Organisation’s incident manager for Asia, reveals that for the first time since the start of the outbreak, more cases are being reported outside China than within it. What can countries do to limit the spread of the virus, and will it become a pandemic? The Economist’s deputy editor Tom Standage hosts a debate with Therese Hesketh, professor of global health at the Institute for Global Health at...

Duration:00:23:11

Clash pipe: Canada’s widening protests

2/26/2020
Successive governments have overlooked the concerns of indigenous peoples, and that has elevated a small gas-pipeline protest into a national conflagration. We look back on the life and legacy of Hosni Mubarak, Egypt’s longest-serving ruler. And the violent turf war in Sri Lanka—between people and elephants. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Duration:00:22:51

Money Talks: covid-19 spreads

2/25/2020
Stockmarkets saw some of the sharpest falls in years after a rise in new coronavirus cases. Is a global economic downturn on the cards? Also, Argentina faces serious debt difficulties—can it strike a new deal with the International Monetary Fund? And, Professor Diane Coyle, from Cambridge University, on the importance of the “data economy”. Rachana Shanbhogue hosts Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer For...

Duration:00:27:26

Mitigating circumstances: coronavirus spreads

2/25/2020
Global markets tanked yesterday as governments reported startling rises in covid-19 cases. Our correspondents around the world assess countries' differing policies, and the prospects for overcoming the outbreak. There’s chaos and intrigue in Malaysia, where persistent ethnic divides continue to dominate the country’s politics. And why Saturday bus services in Israel are a potent election issue. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here...

Duration:00:22:48

The World Ahead: NPT threats

2/24/2020
The Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty turns 50 this year, but the celebrations may be short-lived. Also, the challenges facing Canada’s prime minister, Justin Trudeau, as he tries to keep both China and America happy. And why the future of video-gaming may play out in the cloud. Tom Standage hosts. Music by Chris Zabriskie "Candlepower" (CC by 4.0) Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer or here for The World...

Duration:00:21:05

Peace-meal: ceasefire in Afghanistan

2/24/2020
For now, a “reduction in violence” is holding, and a long-awaited agreement hangs in the balance. But can the Taliban and the country’s government engineer a lasting peace? Brazil’s surfers dominate the sport, but perhaps not for long. And the mismatch between teens’ job desires and their prospects. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Duration:00:22:20

Checks and Balance: Mike drop

2/21/2020
Michael Bloomberg is trying to transform the Democrat presidential field through the sheer weight of his cash. But does politics in America really work that way? John Prideaux, The Economist’s US editor, Jon Fasman, and Charlotte Howard assess whether Bloomberg’s advertising campaign matches his mayoral record, why a legal case from the Watergate era has been crucial to the billionaire’s campaign, and how South Carolina’s minority voters are reassessing the moderate field. Listen to The...

Duration:00:35:30

Clerical era: Iran’s elections

2/21/2020
In a bid to unite a fractious populace, hardliners barred half of the parliamentary candidates; by silencing moderates, the plan will suppress turnout and deepen the disquiet. We take a look at the rise, fall and this week’s pardon of the “junk-bond king” Michael Milken. And why so few Japanese people use their widely welcomed passports. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data...

Duration:00:24:21

Editor’s Picks: February 20th 2020

2/21/2020
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, how to make sense of the latest tech surge, (10:20) examining Jeff Bezos’s $10bn promise to fight climate change (15:30) and, Bagehot on Boris - the imperial prime minister. Zanny Minton-Beddoes, The Economist’s Editor-in-chief hosts. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data...

Duration:00:22:25

The Economist Asks: What makes an extremist?

2/20/2020
Technology has transformed the way extremist groups recruit and mobilise their members. Julia Ebner, author of “Going Dark”, spent two years undercover inside radical organisations of all political hues. This week, in the wake of a far-right terrorist attack in the German town of Hanau, Anne McElvoy asks her what drives perpetrators to commit mass violence. They talk about how Julia won the trust of neo-Nazis and militant Islamists, how gamification is used to radicalise—and why she believes...

Duration:00:29:29

Uncut emerald: Ireland’s unification prospects

2/20/2020
Spurred on by demographic shifts, Brexit and the success of the Sinn Fein party in this month’s election, the once-unthinkable idea of Irish reunification is gaining ground. The IMF is in Lebanon to discuss restructuring the country’s crippling debts; we examine the roots of the economic crisis. And visiting a frigid festival where even the instruments are made from ice. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For...

Duration:00:23:49

Babbage: Feeding tomorrow’s world @AAAS

2/19/2020
By 2050 the global population is projected to reach 9.7 billion. At the same time, climate change is putting increasing pressure on agricultural land. At the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in Seattle, Alok Jha, The Economist’s science correspondent, speaks to nutritionists, genetic engineers and computer scientists to find out whether the planet can sustainably feed future generations. Could genetic engineering make key crops more productive,...

Duration:00:31:22

Many hands light of work: China’s 170m migrant workers

2/19/2020
Strict controls meant to contain the spread of the coronavirus are affecting many of the country’s villages. Our correspondent visits migrant workers who are trapped and draining their savings. We look into why Boeing’s space-and-defence division, which used to prop up the commercial-aircraft side, is itself losing altitude. And why American politicians’ heights matter so much to their prospects. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here...

Duration:00:22:44

Money Talks: Coronanomics

2/18/2020
Coronavirus is causing unprecedented supply and demand challenges for the global economy. How can businesses minimise economic damage? Also, why are MBA schools in China thriving? And, the cities rebelling against the cashless revolution. Patrick Lane hosts. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Duration:00:22:35

A friend of mines: America’s explosive policy turn

2/18/2020
The Trump administration’s stance on anti-personnel landmines worries many—but also speaks to a future in which the rules of war are uncertain. Britain’s universities are coming to grips with how much the slave trade built them. And why the ads on televised sport aren’t always what they seem. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Duration:00:22:06

The snails of justice: the International Criminal Court

2/17/2020
Sudan’s transitional government has pledged to hand over the country’s brutal former leader to the ICC—could justice for the court’s most-wanted man at last give it credibility? Even with a world-beating renewables push, Norway’s wealth depends on oil; how can it navigate the shifting economics of energy? And the bid to make Los Angeles just a bit less car-dependent. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For...

Duration:00:21:45

Checks and Balance: The Trump pay bump

2/14/2020
Amid the drama of impeachment and the Democrats' first primaries, President Trump expanded the list of mostly Muslim nationalities restricted from travel to the US. A hard line on immigration will be a big part of his reelection pitch. He’ll make the link between stronger borders and a booming economy. It turns orthodox economics on its head, but recent data on rising wages will help the president make his case. Might the wall be good economics after all? Callum Williams, senior economics...

Duration:00:32:47

Another man’s Treasury: Britain’s cabinet upheaval

2/14/2020
The dramatic departure of the head of the Treasury reveals Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s desire—and that of his wily chief aide—to take firm hold of the country’s purse strings. A new book finds that a landmark study in psychiatry was not at all what it seemed. And the thumping changes going on in Berlin’s club scene. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer Additional audio “Dustbin Acid (Super Rhythm Trax)”...

Duration:00:23:55

Editor's Picks February 13th 2020

2/14/2020
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week Irish unification is becoming more likely, (09:40) Angela Merkel’s presumed successor quits as party boss (16:30) and, looking at the world through the eyes of options traders Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Duration:00:23:08

The Economist Asks: Thomas Piketty

2/13/2020
The idea that inequality is rising is being used to explain everything from tribalism to low voter turnout. But how much is known about the gap between the haves and the have-nots, is it growing and why does it matter? Economist Thomas Piketty, dubbed “the modern Marx” for his theories on how wealth concentrates, talks to Anne McElvoy and Henry Curr, The Economist’s economics editor, about his new book, “Capital and Ideology”. They debate how unfair societies can learn from their mistakes...

Duration:00:27:03