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The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

Location:

London, United Kingdom

Networks:

The Economist

Description:

The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

Language:

English


Episodes

What Viktor’s spoiled: ten years of Orban

4/9/2020
Under Hungary’s shape-shifting prime minister the country has essentially become a dictatorship—and it seems there is little the European Union can do about it. We examine the serious mental-health effects the covid-19 crisis is having—and will have in the future. And Japan’s #KuToo movement aims to reform some seriously sexist dress codes at work. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding...

Duration:00:22:50

Babbage: Maskarade

4/8/2020
The “silent transmission” of covid-19 means people without symptoms could be a major source of its spread. How effective are masks as a defence? Plus, Kenneth Cukier asks Ivan Oransky, co-founder of Retractionwatch.com, whether the race to uncover the mysteries of the virus could lead to a torrent of “bad science”. For more on the pandemic, see The Economist's coronavirus hub. And please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio...

Duration:00:21:13

Movement at the epicentre: Wuhan’s lockdown lifts

4/8/2020
People are spilling from the Chinese metropolis where the global outbreak took hold. But controls actually remain tight, and authorities’ attempts to spin pandemic into propaganda are not quite working. Mozambique’s rising violence threatens what could be Africa’s largest-ever energy project, in a region that has until now escaped widespread jihadism. And “geomythologists” may have uncovered humans’ oldest tale yet. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist,...

Duration:00:25:36

Money Talks: Banking on it

4/7/2020
Banks have entered this financial crisis in better health than the previous one. But how sick might they get? Emerging-market lockdowns match rich-world ones but their governments cannot afford such generous handouts. Nobel laureate Joseph Stiglitz explains how emerging economies might weather the pandemic. And how Silicon Valley's unicorns are losing their sheen. Simon Long hosts For more on the pandemic, see The Economist's coronavirus hub. And please subscribe to The Economist for...

Duration:00:28:57

States’ evidence: Brazil’s messy covid-19 response

4/7/2020
President Jair Bolsonaro still dismisses the disease as “just the sniffles”, so state and local authorities—and the country’s vast slums—have taken matters into their own hands. The physical and mental needs of the world’s locked-down populations are driving a boom in online wellness. And we look back on the life of the French chef who revolutionised English fine dining. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For...

Duration:00:24:57

An app for that: covid surveillance

4/6/2020
To keep track of the spread of covid-19, some governments are turning to digital surveillance, using mobile-phone apps and data networks. We ask whether this will work—and examine the threat to privacy posed by a digital panopticon. Britain’s Labour Party has a new leader. We ask in which direction Sir Keir Starmer will lead the opposition. And we report on the northern hemisphere’s winter that wasn’t. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here...

Duration:00:24:04

Editor’s Picks: April 6th 2020

4/5/2020
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, covid-19 presents grim choices between life, death and, ultimately, the economy (11:02), lockdowns in Asia have sparked a stampede home (17:52) And, Formula 1 comes up with a breathing machine for covid-19 patients. The Economist is making some of its most important coverage of the covid-19 pandemic freely available to readers of The Economist Today, our daily newsletter. To receive it,...

Duration:00:20:56

Checks and Balance: How long?

4/3/2020
President Trump changed tone and course this week, extending federal guidelines on social distancing to the end of April. New York is now the epicentre of the global pandemic. Yet large parts of the US remain relatively unaffected by covid-19. Public opinion supports tough measures to contain the virus for now. But how sustainable are strict curbs on personal freedom in a country founded on individual liberty? The Economist’s healthcare correspondent Slavea Chankova explains the...

Duration:00:33:28

Trough to peak: how high will American unemployment go?

4/3/2020
The coronavirus pandemic has sent America’s mighty jobs machine into screeching reverse. How bad might the labour market get? Covid-19 is just one reason why Saudi Arabia’s crown prince, Muhammad bin Salman, is finding 2020 to be a much harder year than he’d hoped. And we report on the fight to save a 44,000-year-old cave painting. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy,...

Duration:00:22:26

The Economist Asks: Cory Booker

4/2/2020
The global total of confirmed coronavirus cases has exceeded one million; a quarter of them are in America. The new epicentre of this pandemic is the New York tri-state area. As politicians argue over how to save lives and the economy, Anne McElvoy asks Cory Booker, a senator from New Jersey, whether America can unite to fight the virus. They talk about tussles over vital equipment between states and the federal government. Also, does he agree with the mayor of LA on recommending masks to...

Duration:00:30:00

No port of call: coronavirus may sink the cruise industry

4/2/2020
Cruise ships had been enjoying a golden era—until covid-19 came along. The pandemic has been a catastrophe for the industry. Stranded passengers have taken ill and even died, ships have been banned from ports, and revenue has collapsed. But lawmakers are unlikely to bail it out. In Sweden, daily life has been pretty normal, despite the coronavirus, but can that continue? And we report on Dutch disease—the language’s unusual affinity for poxy swear words. For full access to print, digital...

Duration:00:21:43

Babbage: Fighting contagion with data

4/1/2020
How are location data from mobile phones being used to combat covid-19? And, as more people are forced to stay at home, can broadband and mobile internet connections keep up? Plus, the epidemiologist who helped defeat smallpox, Larry Brilliant, on what needs to be done against the coronavirus. Kenneth Cukier hosts. The Economist is making some of its most important coverage of the covid-19 pandemic freely available to readers of The Economist Today, our daily newsletter. To receive it,...

Duration:00:27:19

Wishful thinking: America’s offer to Venezuela

4/1/2020
The Trump administration makes Venezuela’s Nicolás Maduro an offer he seems sure to refuse: an end to sanctions in return for power-sharing and elections. The coronavirus pandemic has crushed oil prices at the same time a price war is raging: the industry has never seen anything like it. And as videoconferencing brings your workmates into your home, we suggest how to create the right impression. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here...

Duration:00:22:52

Money Talks: The home front

3/31/2020
At the beginning of a financial year like no other, millions of newly furloughed or unemployed Americans face rent and mortgage payments. How long can the financial system withstand the strain caused by the coronavirus pandemic? Many employees have had to make a quick transition to remote working. Businesses struggling to make the switch could look to those companies that have never had an office. And, a day in the life of Bartleby—and his cat. Rachana Shanbhogue hosts. The Economist is...

Duration:00:23:34

In need of Comfort: New York's covid-19 crisis

3/31/2020
New York is at the centre of America’s—and the world’s—coronavirus crisis. The metropolis has also been caught in a damaging three-way political division, involving three of its native sons. In the Middle East and north Africa, governments have imposed unusually harsh covid-19 crackdowns, but will the authoritarians let up afterwards? And we report on a golden age for African art. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here...

Duration:00:23:31

The World Ahead: Pandemic predictions

3/30/2020
As the covid-19 situation worsens, host Tom Standage explores what the pandemic reveals about the perils of prediction and what other future threats we might be overlooking. Also, what a simulation of a future mission to Mars could teach us about self-isolation on Earth today. And, the hit video game “Plague, Inc” is teaching players about the dynamics of pandemics—and how to stop them. Music by Chris Zabriskie "Candlepower" (CC by 4.0) Please subscribe to The Economist for full access...

Duration:00:25:20

Containment or complacency? Covid-19 in Japan

3/30/2020
Japan has reported a relatively low number of coronavirus cases. But concern is growing. The Olympics have at last been postponed and infections are on the rise. Uganda’s president faces a challenge from a pop star—and has his own backing group. And turtles have a deadly appetite for plastic. To them, it may smell like lunch. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit...

Duration:00:22:23

Editor’s Picks: March 30th 2020

3/29/2020
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the role of big government in the time of covid-19, (10:20) assessing the havoc the pandemic is causing in emerging countries, (17:45) and, a guide to videoconferencing etiquette. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

Duration:00:22:09

Checks and Balance: Counting the cost

3/27/2020
President Trump worries a sustained lockdown may do more damage than the covid-19 pandemic itself. More Americans have been laid off in the past week than ever before. He wants the country back open for business by Easter. Meanwhile Congress has approved nearly two trillion dollars to avert a prolonged slump. But is it enough? Chicago restaurant workers tell us what happens when an entire sector shuts down. Idrees Kahloon, US policy correspondent, assesses the rescue package. Economics...

Duration:00:37:50

Life sentences? Prisons and covid-19

3/27/2020
Outbreaks among inmates are all but inevitable. Efforts at prison reform that were already under way will get a boost, because now they will save lives. We examine the international variation in what are considered “essential industries” and “key workers”. And, what our editors and correspondents are doing to pass the time in lockdown. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data...

Duration:00:25:00