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The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

Location:

London, United Kingdom

Networks:

The Economist

Description:

The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

Language:

English


Episodes

An epidemic of hunger: covid-19 and poverty

6/2/2020
The pandemic is driving up the number of impoverished people for the first time in more than two decades. Lockdown-policy calculations are simply different in the poor world. The ill effects of China’s hydropower boom are trickling down to the tens of millions who depend on the Mekong River. And a meditation on the merits of reading others’ diaries. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer See acast.com/privacy for...

Duration:00:20:57

The flames spread: protests in America

6/1/2020
Demonstrations against police violence have only amplified. We ask why George Floyd’s death touched a nerve, and why these events keep happening in America. A look at the country’s cyber-defences reveals considerable weaknesses—what are states to do as electronic attacks outpace the conventional kind? And what museums are doing now to document the history unfolding around them. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here...

Duration:00:22:05

Editor’s Picks: June 1st 2020

6/1/2020
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, how the world’s most powerful country is handling covid-19, China’s decision to impose a security law on Hong Kong threatens a broader reckoning (10:04). And why mercenaries are still hired by African governments (18:30). For more on the pandemic, see The Economist's coronavirus hub. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Duration:00:27:55

Checks and Balance: The American way

5/29/2020
America has passed a grim milestone: 100,000 deaths from covid-19. Many Americans think the country has been hit uniquely hard and that the president’s bungled response is to blame. That view is not borne out by international comparisons. But, as all 50 states reopen with the virus still prevalent, Americans are right to be nervous. How will America’s efforts to recover impact the presidential race? John Prideaux, The Economist’s US editor, hosts with Charlotte Howard, New York bureau...

Duration:00:37:26

Crying foul, again: Black Lives Matter

5/29/2020
Protests have broken out in Minneapolis and far beyond, following another black man’s death at the hands of a white policeman. Can the once-mighty Black Lives Matter make itself heard? The pandemic may threaten London’s place as Britain’s undisputed centre of gravity. And a researcher spooks spooks by revealing a decades-old spy pact. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and...

Duration:00:21:41

The Economist Asks: Marcus Samuelsson

5/28/2020
America’s independent restaurants face a future in which half their tables stand empty. Anne McElvoy asks award-winning chef and restaurateur Marcus Samuelsson how restaurants can reinvent their business models to survive. They talk about converting chic eateries into community kitchens in the covid-19 crisis and why he thinks Joe Biden deserves a chance. Also, what does Mr Samuelsson make of racial tensions following the fatal police brutality case in Minnesota? And he takes Anne McElvoy on...

Duration:00:29:14

Checking their privilege: Beijing’s threat to Hong Kong

5/28/2020
China’s parliament voted today to draft legislation that would utterly undermine the territory’s independence. What now for protesters, for Western powers, for the region’s foreign firms? The pandemic has quashed some crimes but has also created new nefarious opportunities. And it may be closing time for the golden age of the booze business. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy...

Duration:00:21:26

Babbage: The language of the universe

5/27/2020
How can mathematics help us understand our lives and predict the world around us? Host Alok Jha speaks to David Sumpter of Uppsala University about the equations that can help people make better decisions. Christl Donnelly, an epidemiologist at the University of Oxford and Imperial College London details the role mathematics plays in modelling covid-19. Moon Duchin of Tufts University explains how maths can stop gerrymandering. And physicist Graham Farmelo on why he thinks the universe...

Duration:00:25:16

Leading nowhere: assessing Trump’s covid-19 response

5/27/2020
President Donald Trump’s failures of leadership have compounded the crisis. But America’s health-care and preparedness systems have problems that predate him. South Korea marks the 40th anniversary of a massacre that remains politically divisive even now. And, today’s space-launch plan in America blazes a trail for a new, commercial space industry. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer See acast.com/privacy for...

Duration:00:22:42

Money Talks: We’re not going on a summer holiday

5/26/2020
Travel has virtually ground to a halt during the pandemic, exacerbating the global economy’s woes—by complicating trade ties, upending business and devastating the tourist trade. Host Simon Long explores the future of the travel industry, staycations in South Korea and future consolidation in the airline industry. Also, could travel bubbles offer a route to economic recovery? For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: www.economist.com/radiooffer See...

Duration:00:21:43

Shot chasers: big pharma’s covid-19 boost

5/26/2020
The pandemic has caused a shift in how drug firms are viewed: their capacity for big-money innovation will give them immunity in the crisis. Widespread homeworking will have broad consequences, from commercial-property values to urban demographics. And a seemingly innocuous Hong Kong history exam is a window into the territory’s increasingly fraught politics. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer See...

Duration:00:21:05

The World Ahead: After Kim Jong-un

5/25/2020
The North Korean leader’s recent disappearance for three weeks led to intense speculation about his health. What would happen if Mr Kim's regime collapsed? Peter Singer, an author and political scientist, explains how his novel, set in the near future, is helping policymakers respond to artificial intelligence. And how feasible is wireless charging for electric cars? Tom Standage hosts See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Duration:00:25:01

Clear skies with a chance: covid-19’s green opportunity

5/25/2020
Emissions have plummeted as the pandemic slowed the world. It could be a mere blip—but it is an unprecedented opportunity for a greener, more sustainable economy. Serving in America’s armed forces is a long-established path to citizenship, but that path is narrowing. And we ask how sport will emerge from the pandemic, even if the stands stay empty. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer See acast.com/privacy for...

Duration:00:23:56

Editor’s Picks: May 25th 2020

5/25/2020
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the chance to flatten the climate curve, when, why and how to lift coronavirus lockdowns (9:25) and the arrest of Africa’s most wanted man (17:25). Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Duration:00:22:31

Checks and Balance: Fab phwoar

5/22/2020
Taiwanese firm TSMC plans to build a new fab, or computer chip factory, in Arizona. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo called the $12bn investment a boost for American “economic independence” amid China’s creeping dominance in tech. A geopolitical tug-of-war is being fought over nanoscopic wafers of silicon. What do microchips tell us about what’s happening to globalisation? And, as the coronavirus stokes anti-China sentiment, will trade barriers remain no matter who wins November’s...

Duration:00:38:26

Systemic concerns: China’s party congress

5/22/2020
Legislation signalled at the annual meeting undermines the “one country, two systems” approach to Hong Kong’s rule—and may inflame rather than quell protests. Argentina finds itself at the doorstep of default once again; the pandemic is sharpening the hardship ahead. And remembering the woman who expanded Irish poetry with the gloriously quotidian. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer See acast.com/privacy for...

Duration:00:23:06

The Economist Asks: David Simon

5/21/2020
The writer of “The Wire” and “The Deuce” takes a break from the dark side of real life to explore an alternative history in which Franklin D Roosevelt lost the 1940 presidential election to an anti-Semitic isolationist—on a platform to lead America towards fascism. As the country prepares for a very different election, Anne McElvoy asks David Simon about the roots of anti-immigrant feeling in America and whether individuals can change the course of history. Plus, when does a storyteller need...

Duration:00:26:32

Swimming against the currency: Turkey

5/21/2020
A central bank struggling for independence, dwindling foreign reserves to prop up the currency and a president who just hates rates: Turkey’s economy looked shaky even before covid-19. Online dating carries on apace amid lockdowns, and it seems people are forging more emotionally intimate bonds. And the risk that humans might pass the coronavirus to their primate cousins. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here...

Duration:00:18:46

Babbage: Think of the children

5/20/2020
An apparent spike in a rare childhood illness, Kawasaki disease, suggests the coronavirus may manifest very differently in children and raises questions over the role they play in spreading the pandemic. America’s latest offensive against Huawei pushes the global semiconductor industry into uncharted territory; it may also harm American interests in the process. And, flattening the other curve—could fossil fuels be added to covid-19’s casualty list? Kenneth Cukier hosts For more on the...

Duration:00:24:06

Politics trumps co-operation: the WHO’s annual meeting

5/20/2020
Rhetoric and posturing at the World Health Organisation’s annual assembly reveal an agency under geopolitical stresses just when global co-operation is needed most. Illegal logging has become an existential threat for the Amazon; under the cover of covid-19, a new bill in Brazil could hasten its decline. And reflections on the vast musical legacy of Kraftwerk’s Florian Schneider. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here...

Duration:00:23:11