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Forum (KQED)

KQED

The live public affairs program broadcast in the San Francisco Bay Area presents balanced discussions of local, state, national, and world issues. Also included are in-depth interviews with leading figures in politics, science, entertainment, and the arts.

The live public affairs program broadcast in the San Francisco Bay Area presents balanced discussions of local, state, national, and world issues. Also included are in-depth interviews with leading figures in politics, science, entertainment, and the arts.
More Information

Location:

San Francisco, CA

Networks:

KQED

Description:

The live public affairs program broadcast in the San Francisco Bay Area presents balanced discussions of local, state, national, and world issues. Also included are in-depth interviews with leading figures in politics, science, entertainment, and the arts.

Language:

English


Episodes

Pico Iyer’s ‘Autumn Light’ Confronts Life’s Impermanence

5/20/2019
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"Bright though they are in color, blossoms fall. Which of us escapes the world of change?" Travel writer Pico Iyer hears Japanese schoolchildren reciting these words as Americans might recite the Pledge of Allegiance, an anecdote shared in his latest book, "Autumn Light: Season of Fire and Farewells." The book explores the Japanese culture of impermanence in light of his father-in-law's sudden death. Pico Iyer joins Forum to talk about his experience confronting change and life's fragility.

Duration:00:28:13

Norman Mineta’s Groundbreaking Legacy

5/20/2019
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The Japanese Americans interned during World War II included San Jose-born Norman Mineta, then 10 years old. Now 87, Mineta went on to become the mayor of San Jose, a member of Congress, the Secretary of Commerce and the Secretary of Transportation. Mineta joins us in studio to discuss his legacy, including his role in passing the Civil Liberties Act of 1988, which gave reparations to interned Japanese Americans. We'll also hear Mineta's thoughts about the potential for a bipartisan...

Duration:00:23:42

New Federal Data Show Homeless Populations Surging Throughout Bay Area

5/20/2019
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A combined 25,000 people are homeless in San Francisco, Alameda and Santa Clara counties, according to preliminary federal data released Thursday. Since 2017, when officials last conducted a census, homeless populations have risen by 17 percent in San Francisco and 43 percent in Alameda counties. The city of San Jose has seen a 42 percent increase. We'll discuss what's behind the region's intensifying homelessness crisis.

Duration:00:28:14

World Affairs Council’s Jane Wales Steps Down

5/20/2019
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After 20 years leading the World Affairs Council, which convenes nonpartisan conversations around issues such as environmental policy and international affairs, Jane Wales is stepping down. She joins Forum to discuss the council's accomplishments, including the Global Philanthropy Forum and the relaunch of the weekly radio program "WorldAffairs." And we'll talk with Wales about the U.S.-China trade conflict, Brexit and more in international news.

Duration:00:23:43

I Was Your Biggest Fan: What Happens When Your Favorite TV Show Disappoints

5/17/2019
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The highly-anticipated series finale of HBO’s Game of Thrones airs Sunday and disgruntled fans are already calling for a do-over. A petition calling for the network to redo the final season has surpassed 500,000 signatures, with many fans asserting that writers David Benioff and D.B. Weiss have compromised a number of the show’s beloved, previously … Continue reading I Was Your Biggest Fan: What Happens When Your Favorite TV Show Disappoints →

Duration:00:28:13

Dear Truth Be Told: Advice By, and For, People of Color

5/17/2019
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"Is it OK to feel joy when the world is burning?" That's the question posed in the first episode of Truth Be Told, KQED's new advice podcast, which is "made by and for people of color." In each episode, host Tonya Mosley seeks counsel and answers to listener questions from "wise ones." We'll talk with Mosley about why she and other people of color feel mainstream sources of advice often don't speak to their experience. And we want to hear from you: Who do you turn to for advice?

Duration:00:23:41

Why Prescription Drugs are so Expensive in the U.S.

5/17/2019
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One in four Americans who take prescription drugs have a difficult time affording their medicine. That's according to a recent report by the Kaiser Family Foundation, which also found that U.S. spending on prescription medication has increased more than a hundredfold since 1960. As lawmakers on both sides of the aisle work to address skyrocketing drug costs, we'll speak to UC Hastings Law Professor Robin Feldman about what she calls the systemic and perverse incentives that lead to high...

Duration:00:52:28

Acclaimed Warhol Exhibit Pops into SFMOMA

5/16/2019
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You may have seen Andy Warhol's paintings of Campbell's Soup cans or a handful of his silk-screened images, but beginning Sunday, SFMOMA offers the chance to explore Warhol's life "From A to B and Back Again." The exhibit contains more than 300 works from the duration of Warhol's four-decade career. We'll talk about the exhibit, which runs through Sept. 2, with Donna De Salvo, who curated the exhibit for New York's Whitney Museum of American Art, and Gary Garrels, the senior curator of...

Duration:00:28:12

State Investigators: PG&E Equipment Caused Deadly Camp Fire

5/16/2019
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CalFire investigators concluded Wednesday that PG&E's transmission lines caused last November's Camp Fire, which claimed 85 lives, burned more than 150,000 acres and leveled the Butte County town of Paradise. The wildfire was the deadliest and most destructive in California history. We'll discuss the findings and their implications.

Duration:00:23:42

NPR’s Ron Elving Talks Politics and the Challenges of Covering President Trump

5/16/2019
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Over his twenty-year career at NPR, senior editor and correspondent Ron Elving has covered four administrations, 11 Congresses and countless major political events. Elving joins us in studio to talk about the latest news from Washington, the state of political journalism and what it's been like covering the Trump Administration.

Duration:00:52:29

Biography Celebrates French Philosopher Denis Diderot, an ‘Intellectual Beast’ Before His Time

5/15/2019
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Despite a strict Catholic upbringing in 16th century France, philosopher Denis Diderot grew to question the established views of his era, including God's existence, the French monarchy, slavery and sexual mores. Diderot's life and thought are explored in a new book, "Diderot and the Art of Thinking Freely," by Wesleyan University professor Andrew Curran. We'll talk to Curran about why Diderot was an "intellectual beast" ahead of his time, as well as the philosopher's fascination with...

Duration:00:28:14

Alabama Passes Law Banning Nearly All Abortions

5/15/2019
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The Alabama State senate voted Tuesday evening to pass a bill that criminalizes doctors who perform abortions at any pregnancy stage, unless the mother's life is in danger. Under the bill, which passed the Alabama house last month, doctors who perform abortions would face up to 99 years in prison. Four states this year have enacted so-called heartbeat bills, which effectively ban abortions after six weeks. Those laws are not in effect, owing to legal challenges. We'll discuss the Alabama...

Duration:00:23:40

‘Black Death at the Golden Gate’: A Medical Drama from Old San Francisco

5/15/2019
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The bubonic plague is typically associated with Europe and the Middle Ages. But historian David K. Randall's "Black Death at the Golden Gate" explores a little-known chapter in the disease's history: its near-spread from San Francisco to the rest of the U.S. in 1900. Randall joins us to talk about the incident, how racism influenced the response by authorities and what it reveals about life in the Bay Area at the turn of the last century.

Duration:00:28:14

San Francisco Bans City Departments from Using Facial Recognition Technology

5/15/2019
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A vote to ban municipal use of facial recognition technology in San Francisco passed 8-1 by the Board of Supervisors Tuesday. The ban, the first for a major U.S. city, includes the county sheriff's department and city police but does not bar individuals or businesses from using the technology. City agencies will also be required to gain approval before acquiring automatic license plate readers or other types of surveillance technology. Critics of the technology say it violates privacy and is...

Duration:00:23:43

Ani DiFranco Brings Her Radical, Indie Folk to the Page in New Memoir

5/14/2019
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"I was on a mission," singer, songwriter, and activist Ani DiFranco says of her commitment to music at a young age. Known for her unique brand of indie folk and feminism, Ani DiFranco's memoir "No Walls and The Recurring Dream" recalls her journey from a 15-year-old living on her own to life as a 90s headliner grappling with fame. We'll talk to Ani DiFranco about how her music changed the industry, her fans and herself.

Duration:00:28:12

What Will the Trade War with China Mean for the Bay Area?

5/14/2019
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The California economy – including the agriculture and wine industries–are likely to be hard hit by the U.S. trade war with China. The state exported approximately $16.3 billion in goods to mainland China in 2018–more goods than to any other country with the exception of Mexico. Joining us to discuss how the trade war is … Continue reading What Will the Trade War with China Mean for the Bay Area? →

Duration:00:23:41

Landmark California Housing Bill Clears Key Hurdles, Heads to Appropriations Committee

5/14/2019
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California Senate Bill 50 is the latest attempt to mitigate the state's housing crisis. And, unsurprisingly, it is controversial. The bill, introduced by state Sen. Scott Wiener, is intended to spur housing development near transit and job-rich areas, and would override many local zoning laws. Supporters say the bill will provide a much-needed new tool to address the state's housing shortage. Critics say it's a one-size-fits-all approach that fails to address underlying inequality in the...

Duration:00:51:44

Warriors, Sharks Give Bay Area Playoff Fever

5/13/2019
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The Warriors and Sharks both made their Western Conference Finals. Forum will talk about the teams and what these playoffs mean to the Bay Area.

Duration:00:28:15

The Women Who Fought Sex Trafficking in San Francisco’s Chinatown

5/13/2019
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In 1933, when Chinese teen Jeung Gwai Ying escaped forced prostitution in San Francisco, she fled to the Occidental Mission Home. Since 1874, the home had offered thousands of Chinese women refuge and the potential of a new life. In her book, "The White Devil's Daughters," Julia Flynn Siler chronicles the home and the people who passed through its halls. Siler joins Forum to discuss the often overlooked history of sex trafficking in San Francisco's Chinatown.

Duration:00:23:41

Journalist’s Home Raided in Relation to Leaked Police Report on Jeff Adachi’s Death

5/13/2019
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On Friday morning, ten San Francisco police officers used a sledgehammer to raid the home of Brian Carmody, the freelance journalist who published previously undisclosed and salacious details about Adachi’s death. Carmody is vowing to protect his source, as free speech advocates call the raid outrageous and possibly politically motivated. We’ll discuss the story.

Duration:00:19:33