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Think Out Loud

Oregon Public Broadcasting (OPB)

OPB's daily conversation covering news, politics, culture and the arts.

OPB's daily conversation covering news, politics, culture and the arts.
More Information

Location:

Portland, OR

Description:

OPB's daily conversation covering news, politics, culture and the arts.

Language:

English

Contact:

5032006966


Episodes

REBROADCAST Amanda To The Rescue

10/11/2019
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Amanda Giese is the star of the show, “Amanda to the Rescue,” which premiered last year on Animal Planet. Giese began rescuing animals more than a decade ago, and founded Panda Paws Rescue in Washougal, Washington to help some of the most medically challenged animals find their forever homes. We spoke to Giese last year. The second season of her show starts tomorrow night.

Duration:00:19:20

News Roundtable

10/11/2019
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We hear opinions and analysis on this week’s headlines from Eric Fruits, Mark Garber and Naseem Rakha.

Duration:00:22:46

REBROADCAST: The Dreamers

10/11/2019
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In her latest novel, Portland writer Karen Thompson Walker explores the terrifying possibility of a world altered by a highly contagious disease. The disease causes people to fall into a seemingly endless sleep. We’ll listen back to a conversation with Thompson Walker about her book, “The Dreamers.”

Duration:00:40:21

Moonlight Sonata: Deafness In Three Movements

10/10/2019
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Filmmaker Irene Taylor Brodsky grew up with deaf parents. One of her previous films documented her parents getting cochlear implants. Irene Taylor Brodsky explores her son’s deafness, deaf culture and the idea of finding one’s creative voice in her new film: “Moonlight Sonata: Deafness in Three Movements.

Duration:00:15:54

Christopher Marley On “Exquisite Creatures

10/10/2019
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Oregonian Christopher Marley is the artist behind OMSI's new "Exquisite Creatures" exhibit. We sit down with Marley to hear about his unusual approach to animal preservation and how he draws inspiration from the natural world.

Duration:00:24:00

REBROADCAST: Leni Zumas On “Red Clocks”

10/9/2019
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We listen back to a conversation between April Baer and Portland writer Leni Zumas about her book “Red Clocks.” The novel centers around the lives of four women in a small coastal town in Oregon. It's set in an America under a political administration that has taken away most reproductive rights and reserved adoption for married, opposite sex couples only. The novel won a 2019 Oregon Book Award.

Duration:00:41:46

Teaching Social Studies In The Age Of Trump

10/8/2019
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How are the extremely charged political climate and current presidential impeachment proceedings playing out among students in Oregon high school social studies classrooms? We talk with two long time teachers, Burns High School’s Jake Thomson and Peter Edwards at Beaverton High School.

Duration:00:16:30

Oregon Department Of Corrections Aims To Improve Workers’ Well-Being

10/8/2019
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Shortly after Colette Peters took over as director of the Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) in 2012, she commissioned a study of Oregon correctional officers to assess their mental and physical health. Seven years later, DOC has an employee wellness center at each of the state’s 14 prisons. We talk with Peters about what has changed as a result.

Duration:00:13:34

Non-Lead vs. Lead Bullets

10/8/2019
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Lead has been removed from paint, gasoline and plumbing, but not from bullets. When scavengers eat animals that have been shot with lead bullets, it can poison them. Leland Brown is a lifelong hunter who has been hired by the Oregon Zoo to teach other hunters the benefits of using non-lead bullets.

Duration:00:10:35

How California’s New Law About College Athletes Might Affect Oregon

10/7/2019
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California just passed a law that allows college athletes to hire agents and make money for endorsements. Whitney Wagoner, Director of the Warsaw Sports Marketing Center at the University of Oregon, will tell us about the effect this California law might have in Oregon.

Duration:00:12:24

Chown Hardware

10/7/2019
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The oldest hardware store in Portland just celebrated its 140th year in business. Chown Hardware opened in September 1879, before there were cars and even the light bulb, when F.R Chown started his family business. We’ll discuss the history, present and future of the company with the current president and CEO, Kyle Chown.

Duration:00:14:39

Banning Noncompete Agreements

10/7/2019
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In 2008, Oregon banned companies from forcing most workers to sign non-compete job agreements. New research suggests the law increased wages and job hopping for Oregon workers. We hear from researcher Michael Lipsitz about what noncompete agreements are, why companies use them, and how Oregon’s workforce has changed since they were banned.

Duration:00:12:22

REBROADCAST: Judith Arcana

10/4/2019
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The movie "Ask for Jane" is out this week (10/1) on Amazon Prime and other digital platforms. The film is about a network of Chicago-area activists called "Jane" who helped women to get abortions before it was legalized in the landmark Roe v. Wade case. We listen back to our interview with one of those activists, the Portland poet and educator Judith Arcana.

Duration:00:27:42

How ICE Picks Its Targets

10/4/2019
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How do Immigration and Customs Enforcement officers use social media and online tracking tools to find people in the country illegally to arrest? We talk to reporter McKenzie Funk, who just published an investigative story in the New York Times about ICE officers in the Pacific Northwest.

Duration:00:15:15

Nike Oregon Project Coach Alberto Salazar Banned From Sport For 4 Years

10/2/2019
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The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency has issued a 4-year sanction against Alberto Salazar, the head coach of the Nike Oregon Project after a panel determined he violated multiple anti-doping rules.

Duration:00:24:25

Changing Roles of Oregon School Librarians

10/2/2019
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As technology and access to information has changed, school librarians have shifted their priorities to teaching students online media and research literacy skills. We hear from long-time Eugene high school librarian Julie Vignoul about how she teaches students to find literature and navigate credible information.

Duration:00:10:00

After The Big One: Water Pipes

10/2/2019
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There is a 37% chance of a Cascadia Subduction Zone earthquake off the coast of Oregon in the next 50 years. It could be as big as a magnitude 9.0, which would have a significant, lasting impact on the entire region. We're examining how critical infrastructure could fare in a big quake. Today: Portland's water pipes. Our guest is Mike Stuhr, director of the Portland Water Bureau.

Duration:00:15:37

Yurok Tribe Declare Rights Of Personhood For Klamath River

10/1/2019
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Earlier this year, the Yurok Tribe in Northern California passed a resolution declaring legal rights of personhood for the Klamath River. It’s the first river in North America to be given this designation. The tribe is hoping it will lead to better protection for the river. We find out more from Amy Cordalis, general counsel for the Yurok Tribe.

Duration:00:15:30

Sage Grouse Science

10/1/2019
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A new study found that nearly half of all sage grouse wearing GPS transmitters end up dying. Is the science more important than the individual creature being studied? Lee Foster, sage grouse coordinator for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, gives us his take. And he’ll explain how the iconic birds are doing in Oregon right now.

Duration:00:10:45

Black Lives Matter Activists Weigh In On Portland Police

10/1/2019
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Two national leaders in the Black Lives Matter movement are in Portland to talk about policing and how they think the city and Portland Police could improve the contract that’s currently up for negotiation. We hear from DeRay Mckesson and Samuel Sinyangwe about Campaign Zero and what changes they hope to see in Portland’s next police contract.

Duration:00:23:35