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Leading science journalists provide a daily minute of commentary on some of the most interesting developments in the world of science. For a full-length, weekly podcast you can subscribe to Science Talk: The Podcast of Scientific American.

Leading science journalists provide a daily minute of commentary on some of the most interesting developments in the world of science. For a full-length, weekly podcast you can subscribe to Science Talk: The Podcast of Scientific American.
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Location:

United States

Description:

Leading science journalists provide a daily minute of commentary on some of the most interesting developments in the world of science. For a full-length, weekly podcast you can subscribe to Science Talk: The Podcast of Scientific American.

Language:

English


Episodes

One Small Scoop, One Giant Impact for Mankind

7/19/2019
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Just before Neil Armstrong climbed back into the lunar module, he scooped up a few last-minute soil samples--which upturned our understanding of planetary formation. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:03:45

Investigating the Zombie Ant's "Death Grip"

7/18/2019
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Researchers dissected the jaws of ants infected with the Ophiocordyceps fungus to determine how the fungus hijacks the ants' behavior. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:01:44

Attractive Young Females May Have Justice Edge

7/16/2019
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Youths rated as attractive were less likely to have negative encounters with the criminal justice system—but only if they were women. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:37

Tobacco Plants Made to Produce Useful Compounds

7/15/2019
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A proof-of-concept study got transgenic tobacco plants to make a useful enzyme in their chloroplasts, not nuclei, minimizing chances for transfer to other organisms.

Duration:00:02:44

Rhinos and Their Gamekeepers Benefit from AI

7/11/2019
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Starting in 2017, an artificial intelligence monitoring system at the Welgevonden Game Reserve in South Africa has been helping to protect rhinos and their caretakers.

Duration:00:03:36

Backpack Harvests Energy as You Walk

7/10/2019
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The pack produces a steady trickle of electricity from the swinging motion of your stuff. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:01:41

Why Baseballs Are Flying in 2019

7/9/2019
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An analysis of the 2019 edition of the Major League baseball points to reasons why it's leaving ballparks at a record rate.

Duration:00:02:50

Some Hot Dog Histology

7/4/2019
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A lab analysis found that even an all-beef frankfurter had very little skeletal muscle, or "meat." So what’s in there? Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:01:57

Mind and Body Benefit from Two Hours in Nature Each Week

7/1/2019
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People who spent at least two hours outside—either all at once or totaled over several shorter visits—were more likely to report good health and psychological well-being. Jason G. Goldman reports.

Duration:00:03:12

Scientist Encourages Other Women Scientists to Make Themselves Heard

6/30/2019
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Geneticist Natalie Telis noticed few women asking questions at scientific conferences. So she publicized the problem and set about to make a change. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:35

Male Bats Up Mating Odds with Mouth Morsels

6/27/2019
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Males that allow females to take food right out of their mouths are more likely to sire offspring with their dining companions.

Duration:00:02:31

Scientists Fool Flies with "Virtual Tastes"

6/27/2019
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By switching fruit flies' sensory neurons on and off with light, scientists were able to create the sensation of sweet or bitter tastes. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:18

Wheat Plants "Sneeze" and Spread Disease

6/26/2019
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Wheat plants' leaves repel water, which creates the perfect conditions for dew droplets to catapult off the leaves—taking pathogenic spores for the ride. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:01:58

Elite Runners' Microbes Make Mice Mightier

6/25/2019
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Mice that were fed bacteria isolated from elite athletes logged more treadmill time than other mice that got bacteria found in yogurt.

Duration:00:03:56

Science News Briefs from around the World

6/23/2019
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A few brief reports about international science and technology from Canada to Kenya, including one about how humans thousands of years ago in what is now Argentina butchered and presumably ate giant ground sloths.

Duration:00:02:17

Antiperspirant Boosts Armpit and Toe-Web Microbial Diversity

6/21/2019
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Rather than wiping microbes out, antiperspirants and foot powders increased the diversity of microbial flora in armpits and between toes. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:28

Monkey Cousins Use Similar Calls

6/17/2019
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Two monkey species who last shared a common ancestor 3 million years ago have "eerily similar" alarm calls.

Duration:00:02:10

How Millipedes Avoid Interspecies Sexual Slips

6/16/2019
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Millipedes, often blind, have come up with clever physical signals to ward off sexual advances from members of wrong species.

Duration:00:03:40

You Contain Multitudes of Microplastics

6/13/2019
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People appear to consume between 74,000 and 121,000 microplastic particles annually, and that's probably a gross underestimate.

Duration:00:02:36

A Biodegradable Label Doesn't Make It So

6/12/2019
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At the third Scientific American “Science on the Hill” event, “Solving the Plastic Waste Problem”, one of the issues discussed by experts on Capitol Hill was biodegradability.

Duration:00:03:05