60-Second Science-logo

60-Second Science

Science Podcasts >

Leading science journalists provide a daily minute of commentary on some of the most interesting developments in the world of science. For a full-length, weekly podcast you can subscribe to Science Talk: The Podcast of Scientific American.

Leading science journalists provide a daily minute of commentary on some of the most interesting developments in the world of science. For a full-length, weekly podcast you can subscribe to Science Talk: The Podcast of Scientific American.
More Information

Location:

United States

Description:

Leading science journalists provide a daily minute of commentary on some of the most interesting developments in the world of science. For a full-length, weekly podcast you can subscribe to Science Talk: The Podcast of Scientific American.

Language:

English


Episodes

Fishy Trick Lures Life Back to Coral Reefs

12/5/2019
More
Playing the sounds of a healthy reef near damaged corals may help bring the fish community back. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:01:52

Rain Forest Dwellers and Urbanites Have Consistently Different Microbiomes

12/4/2019
More
A study done in South America found that with increasing population density, humans had more diversity of fungi on the skin but less microbial diversity in the gut.

Duration:00:02:34

Internet Cables Could Also Measure Quakes

12/3/2019
More
The fiber-optic cables that connect the global Internet could potentially be used as seismic sensors. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:01:49

Science News Briefs from All Over

12/2/2019
More
A few brief reports about international science and technology from Mexico to Tanzania, including one about the need to quarantine bananas in Colombia that are potentially infected by a fungus.

Duration:00:01:54

Subtle Ancient Footprints Come to Light

11/29/2019
More
Ground-penetrating radar can detect tiny density differences that lead to images of ancient footprints impossible to discern by eye.

Duration:00:01:59

Ancient Rock Art Got a Boost From Bacteria

11/25/2019
More
Indigenous artists in what’s now British Columbia created pigments by cooking aquatic bacteria. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:23

Ick Factor Is High Hurdle for Recycled Drinking Water

11/24/2019
More
Recycled wastewater can be cleaner than bottled water, but people still avoid drinking it because of their disgust over its past condition.

Duration:00:02:58

Bots Outperform Humans if They Impersonate Us

11/21/2019
More
Bots masquerading as humans in a game outperformed their human opponents—but the their superiority vanished when their machine identity was revealed. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:35

Implanting Memories in Birds Reveals How Learning Happens

11/20/2019
More
Researchers activated specific brain cells in zebra finches to teach them songs they’d ordinarily have to hear to learn.

Duration:00:03:11

Dogs Like Motion That Matches Sound

11/19/2019
More
Pet dogs appeared more interested in videos of a bouncing ball when the motion of the ball matched a rising and falling tone. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:01:53

Egyptian Vats 5,600 Years Old Were For Beer Brewing

11/16/2019
More
Archaeologists working in the ancient city of Hierakonpolis discovered five ceramic vats containing residues consistent with brewing beer.

Duration:00:02:55

Famously Fickle Felines Are, in Fact, Clingy

11/13/2019
More
Cats are clingier to their human owners than their reputation would suggest. Karen Hopkin reports.

Duration:00:02:51

Aversion to Broccoli May Have Genetic Roots

11/12/2019
More
Study subjects with a gene variant that heightened their sensitivity to bitterness tended to eat fewer vegetables than people who didn’t mind bitter flavors. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:01:58

Marine Mammal Epidemic Linked to Climate Change

11/9/2019
More
A measleslike virus is ricocheting through marine mammal populations in the Arctic—and melting sea ice might be to blame. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:43

Ant Colonies Avoid Traffic Jams

11/7/2019
More
Researchers tracked thousands of individual ants to determine how they move in vast numbers without stumbling into gridlock.

Duration:00:02:36

Ranking Rise May Intimidate Opponents

11/6/2019
More
In an analysis of chess and tennis matches, players rising in the rankings did better than expected against higher-ranked opponents and better than similarly ranked players who were not rising.

Duration:00:02:54

Familiar Tunes Rapidly Jog the Brain

11/5/2019
More
Within just a third of a second of hearing a snippet of a familiar refrain, our pupils dilate, and the brain shows signs of recognition. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:03:06

Science News Briefs from around the Globe

11/1/2019
More
A few brief reports about international science and technology from Brazil to Hong Kong, including one about male elephants in India exhibiting unusual social behaviors.

Duration:00:02:15

We Owe Our Pumpkins to Pooping Megafauna

10/31/2019
More
The pumpkin’s ancestor was an incredibly bitter, tennis-ball-sized squash—but it was apparently a common snack for mastodons. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:35

Bird Egg Colors Are Influenced by Local Climate

10/30/2019
More
In cold, northern climates, eggs tend to be darker and browner—heat-trapping colors that allow parents to spend a bit more time away from the nest. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:01:49