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Leading science journalists provide a daily minute of commentary on some of the most interesting developments in the world of science. For a full-length, weekly podcast you can subscribe to Science Talk: The Podcast of Scientific American.

Leading science journalists provide a daily minute of commentary on some of the most interesting developments in the world of science. For a full-length, weekly podcast you can subscribe to Science Talk: The Podcast of Scientific American.
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Location:

United States

Description:

Leading science journalists provide a daily minute of commentary on some of the most interesting developments in the world of science. For a full-length, weekly podcast you can subscribe to Science Talk: The Podcast of Scientific American.

Language:

English


Episodes

West Point Uniforms Signify Explosive Chemistry

8/19/2019
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U.S. Military Academy cadets wear the colors black, gray and gold for reasons found in gunpowder's chemistry.

Duration:00:03:05

Secrets of the Universe Trapped in Antarctic Snow

8/14/2019
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Scientists found an interstellar iron isotope in Antarctic snow samples—which hints that our region of the universe may be the remnant of an ancient exploding star. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:20

Certain Personality Types Are Likely to Make a "Foodie Call"

8/13/2019
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Some people go on dates just to score a free meal—a phenomenon known as a “foodie call.” But it takes a certain personality type. Karen Hopkin reports.

Duration:00:02:37

Artificial Intelligence Sniffs Out Unsafe Foods

8/12/2019
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Researchers trained machine-learning algorithms to read Amazon reviews for hints that a food product would be recalled by the FDA. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:01:57

A Computer Tells Real Smiles from Phonies

8/9/2019
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Slight changes around the eyes are indeed a giveaway as to whether a smile is sincere or faked.

Duration:00:01:51

Stare Down Gulls to Avoid Lunch Loss

8/8/2019
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Researchers slowed the approach of greedy gulls by an average of 21 seconds by staring at the birds versus looking elsewhere. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:02

Real Laughs Motivate More Guffaws

8/7/2019
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Honest, involuntary laughter cued people to laugh more at some really bad jokes than they did when hearing forced laughter.

Duration:00:02:42

Extinction Wipes Out Evolution's Hard Work

8/5/2019
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By killing off many of New Zealand’s endemic birds, humans destroyed 50 million years’ worth of evolutionary history. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:10

London Is Crawling with Drug-Resistant Microbes

8/3/2019
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Nearly half of bacteria gathered in public settings around the city were resistant to two or more commonly used antibiotics, such as penicillin and erythromycin. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:01:51

Male Black Widows Poach Rivals' Approaches

8/1/2019
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Mating is risky business for black widow males—so they hitchhike on the silk threads left by competitors to more quickly find a mate. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:12

Babies Want Fair Leaders

7/31/2019
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Babies as young as a year and a half want leaders to fix situations in which they see someone else being treated unfairly.

Duration:00:03:29

Parrots Are Making the U.S. Home

7/30/2019
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Released or escaped parrots are now living in most states and are breeding in at least 21. For some, it’s a second chance at survival.

Duration:00:02:32

Science News Briefs from All Over

7/29/2019
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A few brief reports about international science and technology from Guatemala to Australia, including one about the first recorded tornado in Nepal.

Duration:00:02:31

Tourist Photographs Help African Wildlife Census

7/25/2019
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Photographs snapped by safari tourists are a surprisingly accurate way to assess populations of African carnivores. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:14

For Ants, the Sky's the Compass

7/24/2019
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Computer modeling revealed that insects with a celestial compass can likely determine direction down to just a couple degrees of error. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:03

Why Two Moonships Were Better Than One

7/20/2019
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Engineer John Houbolt pushed for a smaller ship to land on the lunar surface while the command module stayed in orbit around the moon.

Duration:00:02:35

One Small Scoop, One Giant Impact for Mankind

7/19/2019
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Just before Neil Armstrong climbed back into the lunar module, he scooped up a few last-minute soil samples--which upturned our understanding of planetary formation. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:03:45

Investigating the Zombie Ant's "Death Grip"

7/18/2019
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Researchers dissected the jaws of ants infected with the Ophiocordyceps fungus to determine how the fungus hijacks the ants' behavior. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:01:44

Attractive Young Females May Have Justice Edge

7/16/2019
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Youths rated as attractive were less likely to have negative encounters with the criminal justice system—but only if they were women. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:37

Tobacco Plants Made to Produce Useful Compounds

7/15/2019
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A proof-of-concept study got transgenic tobacco plants to make a useful enzyme in their chloroplasts, not nuclei, minimizing chances for transfer to other organisms.

Duration:00:02:44