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Leading science journalists provide a daily minute of commentary on some of the most interesting developments in the world of science. For a full-length, weekly podcast you can subscribe to Science Talk: The Podcast of Scientific American.

Leading science journalists provide a daily minute of commentary on some of the most interesting developments in the world of science. For a full-length, weekly podcast you can subscribe to Science Talk: The Podcast of Scientific American.
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Location:

United States

Description:

Leading science journalists provide a daily minute of commentary on some of the most interesting developments in the world of science. For a full-length, weekly podcast you can subscribe to Science Talk: The Podcast of Scientific American.

Language:

English


Episodes

Your Skull Shapes Your Hearing

10/18/2019
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The resonant properties of your skull can amplify some frequencies and dampen others—and, in some cases, affect your hearing. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:33

Tardigrade Protein Protects DNA from Chemical Attack

10/16/2019
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The Dsup protein protects DNA under conditions that create caustic free radical chemicals.

Duration:00:02:36

"Mars-quakes" Could Reveal How Mars Was Built

10/15/2019
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Rumblings on the Red Planet act like x-rays, allowing scientists to probe the hidden interior of Mars. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:03:11

Artificial Intelligence Learns to Talk Back to Bigots

10/10/2019
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Algorithms are already used to remove online hate speech. Now scientists have taught an AI to respond—which they hope might spark more discourse. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:20

Nobel in Chemistry for Lightweight Rechargeable Batteries

10/9/2019
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The 2019 Nobel Prize in Chemistry goes to John Goodenough, M. Stanley Whittingham and Akira Yoshino “for the development of lithium-ion batteries.”

Duration:00:02:41

Nobel in Physics for Exoplanets and Cosmology

10/8/2019
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The 2019 Nobel Prize in Physics goes to James Peebles “for theoretical discoveries in physical cosmology” and to Michel Mayor and Didier Queloz “for the discovery of an exoplanet orbiting a solar-type star.”

Duration:00:03:45

Nobel in Physiology or Medicine for How Cells Sense Oxygen Levels

10/7/2019
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The 2019 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine goes to William G. Kaelin, Jr., Peter J. Ratcliffe and Gregg L. Semenza “for their discoveries of how cells sense and adapt to oxygen availability.” They identified molecular machinery that regulates gene activity in response to changing levels of oxygen.

Duration:00:02:54

Teeth Tell Black Death Genetic Tale

10/7/2019
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DNA from the teeth of medieval plague victims indicates the pathogen likely first arrived in eastern Europe before spreading across the continent.

Duration:00:03:10

Tiny Worms Are Equipped to Battle Extreme Environments

10/5/2019
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Scientists found eight species of nematodes living in California’s harsh Mono Lake—quintupling the number of animals known to live there. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:47

Heat Changes Insect Call, but It Still Works

10/2/2019
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Tiny insects called treehoppers produce very different mating songs at higher versus lower temperatures, but the intended recipient still finds the changed songs attractive.

Duration:00:02:10

Corals Can Inherit Symbiotic Adaptations to Warming

10/1/2019
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Adult corals can reshuffle their symbiotic algae species to adapt to warming waters—and, it appears they can pass those adaptations on. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:01:55

Brains of Blind People Adapt in Similar Fashion

9/30/2019
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The brains of those who are blind repurpose the vision regions for adaptive hearing, and they appear to do so in a consistent way.

Duration:00:02:27

Science News Briefs from around the World

9/29/2019
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A few brief reports about international science and technology from Hungary to Japan, including one about a wine grape in France that DNA testing shows has been cultivated for almost a millennium.

Duration:00:02:46

Musical Note Perception Can Depend on Culture

9/25/2019
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Western ears consider a pitch at double the frequency of a lower pitch to be the same note, an octave higher. The Tsimane’, an indigenous people in the Bolivian Amazon basin, do not.

Duration:00:02:51

Nature Docs Avoid Habitat Destruction

9/24/2019
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BBC and Netflix nature documentaries consistently shy away from showing viewers the true extent to which we’ve damaged the planet. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:20

Heat Loss to Night Sky Powers Off-Grid Lights

9/19/2019
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A slight temperature difference at night between a surface losing heat and the surrounding air can be harnessed to generate electricity to power lights.

Duration:00:02:56

Early Butchers Used Small Stone Scalpels

9/18/2019
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Homo erectus used hand axes to butcher elephants and other game. But a new study suggests they also used finer, more sophisticated blades. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:08

Microplastics in Fresh Water Are Mostly Laundry Lint

9/17/2019
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Microplastic particles are everywhere, but in freshwater systems, 60 percent of particles are clothing lint from laundry.

Duration:00:02:05

Kids Are Not Hurt by Screen Time

9/16/2019
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A study finds no deleterious effects on mental health when kids spend their leisure time texting and engaging in other online activities.

Duration:00:03:02

Lab-Grown Human Mini Brains Show Brainy Activity

9/13/2019
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As the little structures grow, their constituents specialize into different types of brain cells, begin to form connections and emit brain waves. They could be useful models for development and neurological conditions.

Duration:00:02:53