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Leading science journalists provide a daily minute of commentary on some of the most interesting developments in the world of science. For a full-length, weekly podcast you can subscribe to Science Talk: The Podcast of Scientific American.

Leading science journalists provide a daily minute of commentary on some of the most interesting developments in the world of science. For a full-length, weekly podcast you can subscribe to Science Talk: The Podcast of Scientific American.
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Location:

United States

Description:

Leading science journalists provide a daily minute of commentary on some of the most interesting developments in the world of science. For a full-length, weekly podcast you can subscribe to Science Talk: The Podcast of Scientific American.

Language:

English


Episodes

Lab-Grown Human Mini Brains Show Brainy Activity

9/13/2019
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As the little structures grow, their constituents specialize into different types of brain cells, begin to form connections and emit brain waves. They could be useful models for development and neurological conditions.

Duration:00:02:53

Eavesdropping Puts Anxious Squirrels at Ease

9/12/2019
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Squirrels constantly scan their surroundings for hawks, owls and other predators. But they also surveil for threats by eavesdropping on bird chatter. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:21

Earth's Magnetic Field Initiated a Pole Flip Many Millennia before the Switch

9/11/2019
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Lava flow records and sedimentary and Antarctic ice core data show evidence of planetary magnetic field activity 20,000 years before the beginning of the last pole reversal.

Duration:00:02:47

Humpback Whales Swap Songs at Island Hub

9/10/2019
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At the Kermadec Islands, humpbacks from all over the South Pacific converge and swap songs. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:31

Food Expiration Dates May Mislead Consumers

9/9/2019
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Better food labeling could prevent people from throwing away a lot of “expired” food that’s still perfectly edible.

Duration:00:03:02

Farmland Is Also Optimal for Solar Power

9/5/2019
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The conditions of sunlight, temperature, humidity and wind that make cropland good for agriculture also maximize solar panel efficiency.

Duration:00:02:28

Chemical Tweak Recycles Polyurethane into Glue

9/4/2019
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It’s not easy to recycle polyurethane, so it’s usually tossed out or burned. But a chemical tweak can turn polyurethane into glue. Christine Herman reports.

Duration:00:01:42

Cholesterol Climbs after Crows Chomp Cheeseburgers

9/3/2019
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Wild animals that live near humans have higher cholesterol than their rural counterparts—and our food could be to blame. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:52

How Hurricanes Influence Spider Aggressiveness

8/30/2019
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As Hurricane Dorian approaches Florida, consider that feeding style means that aggressive tangle-web spider colonies produce more offspring after severe weather, while docile colonies do better in calm conditions.

Duration:00:02:40

Graphene Garment Blocks Blood-Sucking Skeeters

8/28/2019
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A small patch of graphene on human skin seemed to block the mosquitoes’ ability to sense certain molecules that trigger a bite. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:25

Martian Winds Could Spread Microbe Hitchhikers

8/26/2019
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Microbes fly tens of miles over Chile’s dry, UV-blasted Atacama Desert—and scientists say the same could happen on Mars. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:01:58

Including Indigenous Voices in Genomics

8/21/2019
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A program at the University of Illinois trains indigenous scientists in genomics—in hopes that future work will be aimed at benefiting those communities. Christine Herman reports.

Duration:00:02:58

West Point Uniforms Signify Explosive Chemistry

8/19/2019
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U.S. Military Academy cadets wear the colors black, gray and gold for reasons found in gunpowder’s chemistry.

Duration:00:03:05

Secrets of the Universe Trapped in Antarctic Snow

8/14/2019
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Scientists found an interstellar iron isotope in Antarctic snow samples—which hints that our region of the universe may be the remnant of an ancient exploding star. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:20

Certain Personality Types Are Likely to Make a "Foodie Call"

8/13/2019
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Some people go on dates just to score a free meal—a phenomenon known as a “foodie call.” But it takes a certain personality type. Karen Hopkin reports.

Duration:00:02:37

Artificial Intelligence Sniffs Out Unsafe Foods

8/12/2019
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Researchers trained machine-learning algorithms to read Amazon reviews for hints that a food product would be recalled by the FDA. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:01:57

A Computer Tells Real Smiles from Phonies

8/9/2019
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Slight changes around the eyes are indeed a giveaway as to whether a smile is sincere or faked.

Duration:00:01:51

Stare Down Gulls to Avoid Lunch Loss

8/8/2019
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Researchers slowed the approach of greedy gulls by an average of 21 seconds by staring at the birds versus looking elsewhere. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:02

Real Laughs Motivate More Guffaws

8/7/2019
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Honest, involuntary laughter cued people to laugh more at some really bad jokes than they did when hearing forced laughter.

Duration:00:02:42

Extinction Wipes Out Evolution's Hard Work

8/5/2019
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By killing off many of New Zealand’s endemic birds, humans destroyed 50 million years’ worth of evolutionary history. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:10