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60-Second Science

Science Podcasts

Leading science journalists provide a daily minute of commentary on some of the most interesting developments in the world of science. For a full-length, weekly podcast you can subscribe to Science Talk: The Podcast of Scientific American.

Leading science journalists provide a daily minute of commentary on some of the most interesting developments in the world of science. For a full-length, weekly podcast you can subscribe to Science Talk: The Podcast of Scientific American.

Location:

United States

Description:

Leading science journalists provide a daily minute of commentary on some of the most interesting developments in the world of science. For a full-length, weekly podcast you can subscribe to Science Talk: The Podcast of Scientific American.

Language:

English


Episodes

Espresso May Be Better Ground Coarser

2/13/2020
A very fine grind can actually hamper espresso brewing, because particles may clump more than larger particles will.

Duration:00:03:30

Feral Dogs Respond to Human Hand Cues

2/11/2020
Most feral dogs that did not run away from humans were able to respond to hand cues about the location of food—even without training.

Duration:00:03:02

Neandertals Tooled Around with Clams

2/7/2020
Neandertals ate clams and then modified the hard shells into tools for cutting and scraping.

Duration:00:03:09

Fingering Fake Whiskeys with Isotopes

2/6/2020
Whiskeys claimed to be from the 19th century are revealed to be made with much more recently grown barley, thanks to the unique isotopic fingerprint of the nuclear-testing era.

Duration:00:02:28

Having an Albatross around Your Boat

2/5/2020
By outfitting 169 albatrosses with GPS data loggers, scientists were able to track fishing boats apparently trying to hide their location. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:14

Science News Briefs from All Over

2/3/2020
Here are a few brief reports about international science and technology from around the world, including one from the Democratic Republic of the Congo about a toad that has evolved coloring that makes it look like a deadly snake’s head.

Duration:00:02:07

Facts about Groundhogs Other Than Their Poor Meteorology

2/2/2020
Groundhogs are less accurate at weather forecasting than are coin flips, but they are nonetheless pretty interesting critters.

Duration:00:03:06

Did Animal Calls Start in the Dark?

2/1/2020
One hypothesis says the ability to vocalize arose in nocturnal animals—and a new evolutionary analysis suggests there may be some truth to it. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:04

Sign Languages Display Distinct Ancestries

1/30/2020
Well more than 100 distinct sign languages exist worldwide, with each having features that made it possible for researchers to create an evolutionary tree of their lineages.

Duration:00:03:00

Docs Given Updated Opioid Prescribing Habit

1/26/2020
Researchers dialed down the default number of opioids in two hospitals’ prescription systems—and doctors ended up prescribing fewer pills. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:14

Some Wolf Pups Show Innate Fetching Talent

1/25/2020
Some wolf pups will play fetch with a stranger, suggesting that an ability to playfully interact with people could have come before, and played a role in, dog domestication.

Duration:00:01:52

Barred Owls Invade the Sierra Nevada

1/24/2020
By listening to the sounds of the forest, biologists were able to identify an invasion of barred owls in spotted owl habitat. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:48

Curiosity Killed the ... Mouse?

1/23/2020
The cat parasite Toxoplasma gondii boosts curiosity in mice—which makes them more likely to be caught by cats, thus continuing the parasite’s life cycle. Karen Hopkin reports.

Duration:00:03:39

This Fish Knows How to Stick Around

1/17/2020
The remora clings to other fish—and appears to use an unusual sense of touch to do so. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:14

Antarctic Is Ripe for Invasive Species

1/15/2020
Mussels and crabs are two of the creatures most likely to invade Antarctica in the next 10 years, a panel of scientists say. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:11

Bacteria Helped Plants Evolve to Live on Land

1/14/2020
Soil bacteria may have taken residence in early algal species, gifting the algae with the ability to withstand drier conditions on land. Annie Sneed reports.

Duration:00:02:34

Meteorite Contains Material Older Than Earth

1/13/2020
The Murchison meteorite, which screamed to Earth 50 years ago, carried with it stardust that's seven billion years old. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:25

Loss of Large Mammals Stamps Out Invertebrates, Too

1/12/2020
Hunted areas of Gabon have fewer large mammals and a thicker forest understory—but they also have fewer termites. Jason G. Goldman reports.

Duration:00:03:48

Brittle Stars Can "See" without Eyes

1/9/2020
The starfish relatives can recognize patterns using photoreceptors on their arms—and their color-changing abilities could have something to do with it. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:43

Atlantic Puffins Spotted Using Tools

1/7/2020
Scientists observed two Atlantic puffins using sticks to scratch themselves—the first known instance of seabirds using tools. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:01:49