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Leading science journalists provide a daily minute of commentary on some of the most interesting developments in the world of science. For a full-length, weekly podcast you can subscribe to Science Talk: The Podcast of Scientific American.

Leading science journalists provide a daily minute of commentary on some of the most interesting developments in the world of science. For a full-length, weekly podcast you can subscribe to Science Talk: The Podcast of Scientific American.
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Location:

United States

Description:

Leading science journalists provide a daily minute of commentary on some of the most interesting developments in the world of science. For a full-length, weekly podcast you can subscribe to Science Talk: The Podcast of Scientific American.

Language:

English


Episodes

This Fish Knows How to Stick Around

1/17/2020
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The remora clings to other fish—and appears to use an unusual sense of touch to do so. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:14

Antarctic Is Ripe for Invasive Species

1/15/2020
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Mussels and crabs are two of the creatures most likely to invade Antarctica in the next 10 years, a panel of scientists say. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:11

Bacteria Helped Plants Evolve to Live on Land

1/14/2020
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Soil bacteria may have taken residence in early algae species, gifting the algae with the ability to withstand drier conditions on land. Annie Sneed reports.

Duration:00:02:34

Meteorite Contains Material Older Than Earth

1/13/2020
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The Murchison meteorite, which screamed to Earth 50 years ago, carried with it stardust that's seven billion years old. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:25

Loss of Large Mammals Stamps Out Invertebrates, Too

1/12/2020
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Hunted areas of Gabon have fewer large mammals and a thicker forest understory—but they also have fewer termites. Jason G. Goldman reports.

Duration:00:03:48

Brittle Stars Can "See" without Eyes

1/9/2020
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The starfish relatives can recognize patterns using photoreceptors on their arms—and their color-changing abilities could have something to do with it. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:43

Atlantic Puffins Spotted Using Tools

1/7/2020
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Scientists observed two Atlantic puffins using sticks to scratch themselves—the first known instance of seabirds using tools. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:01:49

Traffic Cameras Show Why the Yankees Should Suffer Fewer Injuries in 2020

1/6/2020
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The 2019 New York Yankees’ record number of injuries led to a change in training staff that will almost certainly correlate with, but not necessarily cause, a lower injury rate this coming season.

Duration:00:02:56

Science News Briefs from around the Globe

1/5/2020
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A few brief reports about international science and technology from Indonesia to Spain, including one from Brazil about the highest-voltage electric eel ever discovered.

Duration:00:01:52

Part of Real Paleo Diet: It's a Tuber

1/3/2020
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In South Africa archaeologists found the charred remains of a roasted root vegetable. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:01:51

You Traveled Far in 2019

1/2/2020
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Getting around the sun last year was some trip.

Duration:00:01:28

Fido's Human Age Gets New Estimates

12/27/2019
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By comparing how DNA gets altered over the lifetimes of people and dogs, researchers came up with a new way to compare canine years with human years.

Duration:00:02:16

Gift Wrapping Is Effective Future Trash

12/26/2019
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Research suggests people value gifts more when they have to unwrap them. But how do we avoid all the wasted paper? Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:01:28

Superstrong Fibers Could Be Hairy Situation

12/24/2019
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Human hair tested stronger than thicker fibers from elephants, boars and giraffes, providing clues to materials scientists hoping to make superstrong synthetic fibers.

Duration:00:02:54

Flaky Scalps Have a Unique Fungal Microbiome

12/20/2019
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Certain species of bacteria and fungi seem to proliferate on dandruff-ridden scalps. The reason is a little more mysterious. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:09

Moths Flee or Face Bats, Depending on Toxicity

12/19/2019
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Tiger moth species that contain bad-tasting and toxic compounds are nonchalant in the presence of bats, while edible moth species evade their predators.

Duration:00:02:46

Ancient Seawall Found Submerged

12/18/2019
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In shallow waters off the coast of Israel, archaeologists have found entire villages—including one with a sunken seawall. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:01:54

Citizen Scientists Deserve Journal Status Upgrade

12/14/2019
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Here’s an argument that citizen scientists deserve co-authorship on scientific journal papers to which they contributed research.

Duration:00:03:17

Not All Hydropower Is Climate-Considerate

12/13/2019
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While some hydropower facilities release almost no greenhouse gases, others can actually be worse than burning fossil fuels.

Duration:00:03:06

Certain Zip Codes Pick Losers

12/12/2019
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People in certain zip codes are more likely to purchase products that flop, buy homes that are poor investments and pick political candidates who lose. Christopher Intagliata reports.

Duration:00:02:24