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NPR and WBUR's live midday news program

NPR and WBUR's live midday news program
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Location:

Boston, MA

Networks:

WBUR

NPR

Description:

NPR and WBUR's live midday news program

Twitter:

@hereandnow

Language:

English

Contact:

1111 North Capitol St NE Washington, DC 20002 (617) 358-0397


Episodes

Oct. 18, 2019: Nicotine In E-Cigarettes; Venezuela Update

10/18/2019
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Juul announced it will stop selling its fruity flavored e-cigarettes, but high nicotine levels are also why they are so addictive. Dr. Anne Melzer joins us to discuss what doctors are saying about a proposed cap on nicotine in e-cigarettes. And, nine months after political turmoil began in Venezuela, crippling U.S. sanctions have been impacting the lives of people in the country. Host Tonya Mosley talks with journalist Emiliana Duarte who is on the ground there.

Duration:00:43:20

Oct. 18, 2019: Tax On Menstrual Products; 'The Cave' Syria Documentary

10/18/2019
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On average, people who menstruate spend an estimated $150 million dollars a year just on the sales tax for pads and tampons. We talk with an activist about the legal fight to end the so-called tampon tax and the nation's first-ever Period Day. Plus, National Geographic will release a documentary on Friday called "The Cave" about an underground hospital in a suburb of Damascus that was bombed by the Syrian government. Host Peter O'Dowd talks to Oscar-nominated filmmaker Feras Fayyad about his...

Duration:00:43:30

Oct. 17, 2019: 'Looking For Alaska' On Hulu; Decommissioning Chemical Weapons

10/17/2019
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John Green's young adult novel "Looking for Alaska" is now a limited TV series on Hulu. Host Robin Young speaks with Green and Josh Schwartz, the show's co-executive producer and showrunner. Also, hundreds of thousands of chemical weapons at an Army depot in Colorado must be destroyed under an international treaty, but environmental concerns have delayed that until now. Michael de Yoanna with member station KUNC has the story.

Duration:00:43:29

Oct. 16, 2019: Excessive Police Force; Coroners And Mass Shootings

10/16/2019
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The shooting and death of Atatiana Jefferson at the hands of a police officer in Fort Worth — mere weeks after Amber Guyger's murder conviction for killing Botham Jean in Dallas — is highlighting the role fear and racial stereotypes often play in police officers' decision to use lethal force. Also, two years have passed since the mass shooting on the Las Vegas Strip left 58 people dead and hundreds wounded. Host Tonya Mosley speaks with head coroner for Clark County, Nevada, about how...

Duration:00:42:57

Oct. 16, 2019: Zombie Homes Haunt Cleveland; Pulse Nightclub Memorial Controversy

10/16/2019
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A decade after the nationwide housing collapse, thousands of "zombie homes" are still vacant, abandoned and crumbling in the suburbs outside of Cleveland. Host Robin Young toured one east Cleveland neighborhood with a city councilman to find out why. Also, three years after a gunman killed 49 people in the Pulse nightclub in Orlando, plans to build a memorial and museum are moving forward — but not without controversy. Danielle Prieur from WMFE reports.

Duration:00:43:26

Oct. 15, 2019: Climate Change Insurance; California's Homeless Crisis

10/15/2019
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Last year, insurance payouts caused by climate-related events totaled $2.4 trillion worldwide. The Economist reporter Matthieu Favas recently wrote about the issue and joins host Robin Young to discuss. Also, a quarter of the nation's homeless population is in California, with many cities struggling to deal with the problem. The city of Bakersfield has seen a 50% increase in homelessness in the last year. Host Tonya Mosley has the report.

Duration:00:41:50

Oct. 14, 2019: Living Funerals; Drug Resistance Technology

10/14/2019
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Living funerals are held for those who are still alive but nearing death. Author Mary-Elizabeth Williams speaks about her experience attending her friend's living funeral. Also, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 2 million Americans get drug-resistant infections every year. Of those, about 23,000 die. A new diagnostic tool that identifies bacteria quickly, at a genetic level, might help patients and fight antibiotic resistance.

Duration:00:41:54

Oct. 14, 2019: The Economics Of Climate Change; Latino Voters In Texas

10/14/2019
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The Latino vote is still up for grabs by both parties in Texas, and it could play a decisive role in the 2020 presidential election. We talk with the lead author of a new report from the University of Houston that takes on some common misconceptions about Latino Republican voters in Texas. Also, climate activist and journalist Naomi Klein says the real inconvenient truth is that fixing climate change requires major economic change. Host Robin Young speaks with Klein about her new book "On...

Duration:00:41:06

Oct. 11, 2019: Former U.S.-Ukraine Ambassador Testifies; Cloud Appreciation

10/11/2019
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Former ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch is testifying on Capitol Hill Friday as part of the impeachment inquiry after the White House blocked another official from testifying earlier this week. We get the latest from NPR's Susan Davis. And, host Peter O'Dowd takes a tour of the sky with Gavin Pretor-Pinney, founder of the Cloud Appreciate Society.

Duration:00:41:50

Oct. 11, 2019: Mashrou Leila; 'South Park' Provokes China

10/11/2019
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Lebanese indie-pop band Mashrou Leila challenges the status quo in the Middle East. We speak with lead singer and lyricist Hamed Sinno and drummer Carl Gerges about their music and why they're banned in parts of the Arab world. Also, "South Park" marked its 300th episode on Thursday. NPR's Eric Deggans joins host Jeremy Hobson to discuss the show's criticism of Chinese censorship and political prisoner camps in the country.

Duration:00:41:56

Oct. 10, 2019: Giuliani Associates Arrested; Surge In STD Cases

10/10/2019
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Two associates of President Trump's personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani have been arrested on campaign finance charges. The associates reportedly aided Giuliani's efforts to have Ukraine launch an investigation into former Vice President Joe Biden. We get the latest from NPR's Ryan Lucas. Also, a new CDC report reveals a rise in the number of STD cases in the U.S. in 2018 compared to the year before. We speak with an epidemiologist at the CDC who worked on the report.

Duration:00:39:42

Oct 10, 2019: Turkey's Offensive In Syria; Jimmy Fallon On Kids And Comedy

10/10/2019
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Turkish ground troops are continuing their advance against Kurdish fighters in northern Syria. Host Jeremy Hobson speaks with former ranking Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee Jane Harman about the invasion that has been condemned around the world. Also, on top of a 20-year career in comedy as late-night television host and cast member on Saturday Night Live, Jimmy Fallon is also an author. We speak with Fallon about comedy, having kids and his new children's book, "This is Baby."

Duration:00:43:37

Oct 9, 2019: California Power Outages; Psychedelic Substances Research

10/9/2019
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In California, the utility PG&E has begun shutting off electricity because of concerns of high winds and the potential for wildfires. Host Peter O'Dowd speaks with KQED's Brian Watt about power outages that are expected to impact hundreds of thousands of people across the state. Also, Johns Hopkins University has launched a center for psychedelic research with $17 million in donations from private donors. We talk with William Richards, a psychologist at Johns Hopkins, about his decades-long...

Duration:00:43:28

Oct. 9, 2019: Denmark Climate Summit; Enforcing Subpoenas

10/9/2019
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World mayors are gathered in Copenhagen, Denmark, this week to discuss how their cities can fight climate change. We speak with one of the organizers of the summit, Mark Watts, executive director of C40 Cities. Also, the Nobel Prize in chemistry has been awarded to the three scientists who, over decades, developed lithium-ion batteries and created a portable technology revolution. And, Lisa Kern Griffin, former federal prosecutor and Duke University law professor, joins us to discuss if...

Duration:00:42:45

Oct. 8, 2019: How Schools Teach Impeachment; Drive-Thrus Slowing Down

10/8/2019
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How are high school students learning about the impeachment as the politics play out in Washington? We speak with John Speicher, a government teacher at Putnam City High School in Oklahoma City. Also, a new report finds that drive-thrus in the U.S. are getting slower. But some say that's not necessarily a bad thing. Host Jeremy Hobson talks about the state of fast food with Sam Oches, editor of QSR Magazine.

Duration:00:42:41

Oct. 7, 2019: Sen. King On Syria; Party Like A Federal Official

10/8/2019
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On Sunday, the White House announced U.S. forces will stand aside while Turkey prepares to launch an offensive in Northern Syria. Host Jeremy Hobson speaks about the news with Maine Sen. Angus King, who is on the Senate Armed Services Committee. Also, Bryan Rafanelli founded one of the country's premier event planners, Rafanelli Events. His new book "A Great Party: Designing the Perfect Celebration" highlights some of his event successes from weddings in Istanbul to celebrations at the White...

Duration:00:43:23

Oct. 8, 2019: Sondland Blocked From Testifying; China Versus NBA

10/8/2019
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The State Department has blocked Gordon Sondland, the U.S. ambassador to the European Union, from appearing in front of House committees on Tuesday with hours to spare. We speak with NPR's Claudia Grisales to answer the question: Who is Gordon Sondland? Also, China's state broadcaster canceled plans to show a pair of preseason NBA games in that country later this week after Houston Rockets general manager Daryl Morey tweeted support for anti-government protesters in Hong Kong. Host Jeremy...

Duration:00:42:45

Oct. 7, 2019: David Byrne's 'American Utopia'; Rural Chronic Disease

10/7/2019
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David Byrne, the beloved Talking Heads frontman, debuts his show "American Utopia" this month. Byrne joins host Robin Young to talk about the unusual show, which features new songs, as well as Talking Heads favorites. Also, Americans who live in rural parts of the U.S. have much higher rates of death than the rest of the country. The causes are not only diseases but their side effects — depression, anxiety and suicide. Some experts are recommending ways to prevent these premature deaths....

Duration:00:42:50

Oct. 4, 2019: Rep. Engel On Impeachment Inquiry; Vape Shops Shutter

10/4/2019
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The inspector general of the intelligence community is on Capitol Hill Friday addressing questions surrounding the president's July phone call with Ukraine's president. We speak with Congressman Eliot Engel, Chairman of the House Committee on Foreign Affairs, about the future of the impeachment inquiry. Also, Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker announced a four-month ban on the sale of all vaping products last week in a response to the growing public health crisis that has injured more than...

Duration:00:42:47

Oct. 4, 2019: 'City Of Women' Map; Bayou Steel Layoffs

10/4/2019
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Hundreds of employees of the Bayou Steel plant in LaPlace, Louisiana, learned this week that they will be losing their jobs because the plant is closing at the end of November. Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards said the company was "particularly vulnerable to tariffs" because it relies on mostly imported, recycled scrap metal. Also, in 2016, the first "City of Women" map was designed to reimagine public space by naming each subway stop after a famous woman. Host Tonya Mosley talks to one of...

Duration:00:43:26